Mulhacén

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Mulhacén

(mo͞oläthān`) or

Muley-Hacén

(mo͞olā`-äthān`), peak, 11,411 ft (3,478 m) high, Granada prov., Spain; highest point of the Sierra Nevada and of Spain.

Mulhacén

 

a peak in Spain, the highest point on the Iberian Peninsula (3,478 m). It is located in the Andalusian Mountains of the Sierra Nevada. The mountain is composed of schists. On the northern slope is a small avalanche-formed glacier, the southernmost one in Europe.

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It's a baby version of the Derbi 650cc Mulhacen scrambler.
The Mulhacen has more low-down poke, it runs out of puff earlier and vibrations tingle through my feet and hands at certain speeds.
They hit trouble on the south face of the Mulhacen when temperatures plummeted with icy winds.
At 11,414ft, the Mulhacen is more than two-and-a-half times higher than Britain's tallest mountain, Ben Nevis.
The aim is to trek to Sierra Nevada and climb the lunar landscape of mainland Spain's highest mountains, Mulhacen, more than 3,500m, in 72 hours.
As Pogson lay on the floor, Mulhacen galloped over him before falling.
The objective is to trek the south side of the Sierra Nevada in southern Spain and climb the desolate lunar landscape of one of mainland Spain's highest mountains, Mulhacen, over 3,500m, in 72 hours.
We didn't quite make it up the highest mountain, the Mulhacen, but many did and you don't have to be too experienced a climber to do so.
Ex-Army instructor Colin Riddiough, his son Stephen and two friends were on Mulhacen, the Iberian peninsula's highest peak, which overlooks the Costa del Sol's beaches, when atrocious weather unexpectedly set in.
Teessiders Colin Riddiough, Paul Dick and John Plews froze to death after being caught in a ferocious blizzard while climbing Spain's highest mountain Mulhacen.
Steve woke at 9,000ft on 11,414ft Mulhacen peak in southern Spain to find dad Colin, 46, and friends Paul Dick, 56, and John Plews, 30, unconscious beside him.
The mountaineers left on Saturday but were caught in treacherous conditions, high on the south side of Mulhacen, Iberia's highest peak.