Multiprotocol Label Switching

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Multiprotocol Label Switching

(networking)
(MPLS) A packet switching protocol developed by the IETF. Initially developed to improve switching speed, other benefits are now seen as being more important.

MPLS adds a 32-bit label to each packet to improve network efficiency and to enable routers to direct packets along predefined routes in accordance with the required quality of service. The label is added when the packet enters the MPLS network, and is based on an analysis of the packet header. The label contains information on the route along which the packet may travel, and the forwarding equivalence class (FEC) of the packet. Packets with the same FEC are routed through the network in the same way.

Routers make forwarding decisions based purely on the contents of the label. This simplifies the work done by the router, leading to an increase in speed. At each router, the label is replaced with a new label, which tells the next router how to forward the packet. The label is removed when the packet leaves the MPLS network.

Modern ASIC-based routers can look up routes fast enough to make the speed increase less important. However, MPLS still has some benefits. The use of FECs allows QoS levels to be guaranteed, and MPLS allows IP tunnels to be created through a network, so that VPNs can be implemented without encryption.

MPLS Resource Center.

[RFC 3031]
References in periodicals archive ?
A clear candidate is the Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) technology, which is currently under advanced standardization process.
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The combination of PurePacket and the Intelligent Service POP uses the Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) standard to assure service quality levels for voice and data traffic from the customer premise and across core networks, to their ultimate destination.
The PurePacket platform, which uses the Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) standard to maximize the traffic carrying capacity of access networks, and manage quality of service (QoS), enables carriers to create a wide range of offerings, each with its own Service Level Agreement (SLA).

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