multiverse

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Related to Multiverses: dark matter, String theory

multiverse

(mul -ti-verss) A speculative concept that the Universe we inhabit is not unique but is merely one of a very large number of Universes, which can have completely different physical laws and possibly even a different number of space–time dimensions. The multiverse concept emerged in the last few years of the 20th century due to the combination of the observation that ‘fine tuning’ of the basic physical laws is necessary for life to exist in the Universe and the realization that the collapse of stars to black holes and the emergence of ‘baby Universes' sprouting into existence in inflation theory may allow other Universes to come into existence. There is no experimental or observational support for the multiverse concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other three naturalistic explanations that attempt to make sense of the sheer unlikelihood that a life-permitting universe would come about spontaneously (without being designed by an intelligent being) postulate that countless universes--a multiverse --exist and that the extremely large number of universes makes it likely that a life-friendly universe would come about.
Says Andrei Linde, "If inflation is there, the multiverse is there.
Despite his self-effacing style (Manly admits that "a few of the multiverse concepts described in this book are perhaps as fictitious as the Harry Potter series) his goal is to convince us that "the time has come to take seriously the idea of a multiple universe reality.
Yet maybe Bruno's real success was in beginning to grapple with the concept of a multiverse (also called a "meta-universe") in which many universes co-exist: a concept that is now advanced in response to an argument that Christians raise when trying to prove that God exists.
Subsequent theories were to give birth to many variations of the Big Bang model and the process continues, producing, in turn, an inflationary universe, a chaotic universe, multiverses, an eternal universe, and so on.
Rees quite lucidly trots out almost all of the current brainstorms and theories on how our universe came into being, not to mention other hypothetical multiverses and their properties.
Life as we don't know it is "weird" by Toomey's definition, and he takes the reader on a fascinating journey starting with extreme environments on Earth as studied by microbiologists and ending with mind-bending multiverses as theorized by astrophysicists.
He also summarizes string theory, the expansionary model of the universe, and the notion of multiverses (universes other than our own).
He then points out that a more common approach is the so-called "weak anthropic principle" in which our universe, among endless multiverses, by chance has the right properties for life.
He tells of the M-theory of superstrings and multiverses, of speculations about the world as a computer program, and of new ideas of computation and complexity.
The first section has Jim Peebles, Martin Rees, Bob Hazen, and Steve Schneider, among others, providing eight excellent summaries of current thinking regarding the evolution of the universe including the first stars, the existence of multiverses, the fate of the universe, misconceptions about the Big Bang, and the evolution of Earth.
125, now seems to be ruled out and the case for a multiverse is strengthened.