Multscher, Hans

Multscher, Hans

(häns mo͝ol`chər), c.1400–1467, outstanding German sculptor and painter of the Swabian school of Ulm. Early in life he traveled to the Netherlands and Burgundy. Probably influenced by the work of Claus Sluter, he developed a powerfully realistic figural style in both painting and sculpture. About 1427 Multscher settled in Ulm. For the east facade of the town hall he carved figures of Charles the Great and equestrian statues of the kings of Poland and Bohemia. In 1437 he painted the Wurzacher Altarpiece (partially lost; Berlin). He also worked on the famous altarpiece (1457) at Sterzing (now Vipiteno) in the Tyrol. For this work, a combination of painting and sculpture (now dispersed), he executed sculptures of the Virgin and saints, while the wings were painted by another artist.

Multscher, Hans

 

Born circa 1400, in Reichenhofen, near Leutkirch, Württemberg; died 1467, in Ulm. German sculptor and painter.

Multscher worked in Ulm from 1427. His style was influenced by Robert Campin and Netherlandish and French sculpture of the Early Renaissance (Claus von Sluter). At the same time as L. Moser and K. Witz, Multscher began to make studies from life and to introduce elements of everyday life into religious compositions. He sought to endow the persons in his paintings with individuality by giving them grotesque postures and facial expressions, as in his Landsberg altar (1437, Dahlem Museum, Berlin; formerly considered to have been from Wurzach). As a sculptor, Multscher was more conservative.

REFERENCE

Tripps, M. Hans Multscher. Weissenhorn, 1969.
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