mural

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mural

a large painting or picture on a wall

Mural

A wall painting; fresco is a type of mural technique.

mural

1. Pertaining to a wall.
2. A mural painting, decorative or figurative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gaining international acclaim in association with the golden age of Mexican muralism, Rivera created an innovative painting style combining the influence of European art, socialist ideals, and the heritage and culture of indigenous Mexico.
Latorre takes Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco from the 1960s to the 1990s as its case studies to explore the role that indigenist iconography played in muralism.
Latorre's strongest chapters articulate the nature in which muralism reflected the multifaceted nature of Chicana/o identity even through the use of indigenist iconography and those that elucidate the genealogy of Chicana/o murals.
Born in 1886, Rivera is associated with the golden age of Mexican muralism, a synthesis of European art-historic influences, socialist ideals and the heritage and forms of indigenous Mexico.
Mexico can develop a dance movement of great breadth, comparable to its cinema of the forties or to muralism.
59) She is now completing a new book-length manuscript to be released later this year, If These Walls Could Talk: Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice.
s two entries are those on Mexican muralism and the Harlem Renaissance.
Indeed, the shape and dimensions of the paintings far more closely match the long-standing tradition of heroic narrative work as sanctioned by artists from Rubens and Lebrun to David and Gericault, a handmade monumentality revived for Pollock's own generation by the muralism of Guernica and of the revolutionary Mexicans he so much admired.
Phil Leider, a former editor of Artforum, wrote in the magazine in 1970, "It is astonishing that even as [the Irregular Polygons'] are being made the vision of a monumental decorative muralism [the Protractor, series] is taking form in the artist's mind.
As more and more surfaces were subjected to an array of personal and social expression - facades as well as interiors of abandoned structures subjected to graffitied muralisms, sidewalks to stencils, and just about everything to the ongoing accumulation of wheat-pasted flyers - the poetics of urban decay became inextricably linked with the politics of subversion.