Murasaki Shikibu


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Murasaki Shikibu

(mo͞o'räsä`kē shē'kēbo͞o`), c.978–1031?, Japanese novelist, court figure at the height of the Heian period (794–1185). Known also as Lady Murasaki, she is celebrated as the author of the romantic novel Genji-Monogatari [tale of Genji], one of the first great works of fiction to be written in Japanese and often considered the world's first novel. Written in long, flowing, lyrical sentences, it concerns the life and loves of Prince Genji and his descendants and is a subtle and thorough delineation of a complex society.

Bibliography

See her diary translated by R. Bowring (1982); classic translation of Genji by Arthur Waley (1925, repr. 2000); modern translations by E. G. Seidensticker (1976), R. Tyler (2001), and D. Washburn (2015).

Murasaki Shikibu

11th-century Japanese court lady, author of The Tale of Genji, perhaps the world's first novel
References in periodicals archive ?
Although on one level the decision to celebrate Murasaki Shikibu clearly reflects a traditionalist sensibility, on another level her selection for the 2,000 yen note was a progressive breakthrough: beginning in the year 2000, for the first time in living memory, the yen celebrated a woman.
Murasaki Shikibu is the second woman whose portrait will have been used on a Japanese bill, following Empress Jingu, whose portrait was used on the 1 yen, 5 yen and 10 yen notes issued in 1883, the Finance Ministry said.
McIntyre took the name, which translates as ``the shining one,'' from a classic Japanese novel, ``The Tale of Genzi'' by Murasaki Shikibu.
I can think of no writer who manages to convey aware - the fleetingness of things - as well as Ramke does, except for the great Murasaki Shikibu herself.
As is well known, the first truly great example of that kind of writing is not a novel but the monogatari by Murasaki Shikibu, the Genji Monogatari (the English translators' Tale of Genji).
The tale is attributed to Murasaki Shikibu, a lady of the Heian court.
But surely the Greeks got there first, as did Chaucer, Rabelais, Dante, not to mention Mencius, Murasaki Shikibu, and the Sanskrit poet Valmiki, who first put the Ramayana Saga together?
The novel, believed to be written nearly 1,000 years ago by Murasaki Shikibu, is about the life and many loves of a Japanese prince called Hikaru Genji, or shining Genji, who is stripped of his royal status at a young age.
I can think of no writer who manages to convey aware--the fleetingness of things--as well as Ramke does, except for the great Murasaki Shikibu herself.
The other side of the bill will depict a scene of the Tale of Genji, the Japanese classic written in the early 11th century by court lady Murasaki Shikibu.
Her literary soul sisters are the writers of the Heian Period (794-1185), the heyday of Japanese women's literature, especially Murasaki Shikibu, author of The Tale of Genji.
She had prepared for her trip by reading Murasaki Shikibu in advance, which is like preparing for a trip to England by reading Shakespeare.