hypertrophy

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hypertrophy

(hīpûr`trəfē), enlargement of a tissue or organ of the body resulting from an increase in the size of its cells. Such growth accompanies an increase in the functioning of the tissue. In normal physiology the growth in size of muscles (e.g., in an athlete as a result of increased exercise) and also the enlargement of a uterus in pregnancy are caused by hypertrophy of muscle cells. In pathology the thickening of the heart muscle from overstrain, as in hypertensionhypertension
or high blood pressure,
elevated blood pressure resulting from an increase in the amount of blood pumped by the heart or from increased resistance to the flow of blood through the small arterial blood vessels (arterioles).
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 (high blood pressure), is the result of hypertrophy. An organ subjected to extra work (e.g., the one kidney left to function after surgical removal of the other) usually compensates by enlarging; in such cases hyperplasia, an increase in the number of cells, generally accompanies hypertrophy.

Hypertrophy

 

an increase in the volume of a body organ or of any of its parts.

Hypertrophy in man (or in animals) may occur either as the result of the enlargement of the individual component elements of an organ (cells and tissues) or as the result of an increase in their quantity (hyperplasia). True hypertrophy and false hypertrophy are distinguished. The former includes enlargement in volume or mass of specific elements as the result of an increased functional load (so-called functional, or compensatory, hypertrophy) or disruption of the regulatory influences of the nervous and endocrine systems. Functional hypertrophy may appear in healthy persons who are occupied with physical labor, such as in athletes (“physiologic hypertrophy” of the muscles). It may also appear upon affection of a part of any organ, such as after heart failure (compensatory hypertrophy) or after the destruction of a paired organ, such as a kidney (vicarious hypertrophy). Compensation for the impaired functions occurs in all instances of functional hypertrophy. Examples of hypertrophy occurring as a result of the disruption of neuroendocrine influences include acromegaly and gynecomastia; in these cases the hypertrophy has no compensatory significance but is accompanied by considerable disturbances of function. False hypertrophy refers to enlargement of the organ as the result of excessive growth of the interstitial, most often the adipose, tissue in response to atrophy of the parenchyma (the functional tissue). Function of the organ in such cases is usually decreased.

L. L. SHIMKEVICH

Hypertrophy of plant organs is the result of an increase in the size of their cells. The hypertrophy may be the effect of increased synthesis of the substances of the cell membrane or cytoplasm, deposits of reserve compounds, or the development of polynucleosis or polyploidy. The causes of hypertrophy include disruption of the synthesis and metabolism of phenol compounds, amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, as well as deficiency of trace elements. The condition may also be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, invertebrates, and plant parasites. It may accompany many mutations, grafts, and the effects on the plant of ionizing radiation or ultrasound. Hypertrophy is usually interconnected with hyperplasia and disruptions of tissue differentiation in the organs. In many instances (for example, when there is development of tumors or galls) hypertrophy follows cell division; after mechanical injury and physical or chemical effects, however, it is often primary. Hypertrophy is observed in higher as well as in lower plants.

E. I. SLEPIAN

hypertrophy

[hī′pər·trə·fē]
(pathology)
Increase in cell size causing an increase in the size of an organ or tissue.

hypertrophy

enlargement of an organ or part resulting from an increase in the size of the cells
References in periodicals archive ?
2009), this data supports the theory that the cellular mechanism of postnatal muscle hypertrophy can be influenced by [beta]-AA.
Hayes, "Effects of Supplement Timing and Resistance Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy," Med.
Based on these results it is reasonable to conclude that the RT component of the intervention was responsible for the increase in muscle cross-sectional area and that RT alone or combined with ET provides a greater stimulus for muscle hypertrophy than ET alone.
Adaptations of the Gray Catbird Dumetella carolinensis to long-distance migration: flight muscle hypertrophy associated with elevated body mass.
Isolated unilateral temporal muscle hypertrophy is a rarely reported clinical entity with an unclear etiology.
2] Evidence suggests that the pyloric muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia of IHPS develop postnatally, although the pathogenesis is not fully characterized.
today announced that researchers at the Children's National Medical Center will use the BioTrove OpenArray[TM] SNP genotyping system to examine genes for diabetes-related traits, as well as to investigate genetic variants affecting skeletal muscle hypertrophy - the build-up of skeletal muscle tissue - with resistance training in multiple large populations.
Overexpression of interleukin-15 induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy in vitro: Implications for treatment of muscle wasting disorders.
4,5] Previous studies have demonstrated that BOO causes smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrocyte hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the bladder wall.
The objective of the study, titled, 'Rice Protein Increases Lean Body Mass, Muscle Hypertrophy, Power and Strength Comparable to Whey Protein Following Resistance Exercise,' was to determine if high doses of rice protein isolate could increase recovery and elicit adequate changes in body composition compared to whey protein isolate if given following periodized resistance-training.
Despite that possibility, it has been shown in the past that the muscle hypertrophy that RT induces, and that in turn induces diluted mitochondrial volume, indeed interferes with aerobic performance enhancement.
It is essential that athletes consume sufficient amounts of protein while also appropriately timing their protein consumption in order to experience a positive nitrogen balance and eventual muscle hypertrophy (Campbell et al.