Urania

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Related to Muse of astronomy: Urania, equine gait

Urania

(yo͝orā`nēə): see AphroditeAphrodite
, in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of fertility, love, and beauty. Homer designated her the child of Zeus and Dione. Hesiod's account of her birth is more popular: she supposedly rose from the foam of the sea where Uranus' genitals had fallen after he had been
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; MusesMuses,
in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of
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.

Urania

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Urania, asteroid 30 (the 30th asteroid to be discovered, on July 22, 1854), was named after the Greek muse of astronomy. Its orbital period is 32/3 years, and its diameter is 94 kilometers. Urania is one of the more recent asteroids to be investigated. Preliminary material on Urania can be found in Demetra George and Douglas Bloch’s Astrology for Yourself, and an ephemeris (table of celestial positions) for it can be found in the second edition of George and Bloch’s Asteroid Goddesses. Unlike the planets, which are associated with a wide range of phenomena, the smaller asteroids are said to represent a single principle. George and Bloch give Urania’s principle as “inspired knowledge.” Zipporah Dobyns speculates that the meanings of Urania are related to those of Uranus, namely, seeking of freedom, the need for variety, intellectual openness, etc. The late John Addey regarded Urania as the ruler of astrology (which Uranus is usually said to rule); he found it prominent in the charts of astrologers. J. Lee Lehman associates it with science (perhaps even “the muse of science”), particularly with the ability to take a range of data and translate them into intelligible form.

Sources:

Dobyns, Zipporah. Expanding Astrology’s Universe. San Diego: Astro Computing Services, 1983.
George, Demetra, with Douglas Bloch. Asteroid Goddesses: The Mythology, Psychology and Astrology of the Reemerging Feminine. 2d ed. San Diego: Astro Computing Services, 1990.
George, Demetra. Astrology for Yourself: A Workbook for Personal Transformation. Berkeley, CA: Wingbow Press, 1987.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

urania

[yə′rā·nē·ə]
(inorganic chemistry)

Urania

muse of astrology. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1119]

Urania

muse of astronomy. [Gk. Myth.: Jobes, 374]

Urania

Muse of astronomy. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 284]