MusicBrainz


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MusicBrainz

A community driven music database from the MetaBrainz Foundation, San Luis Obispo, CA (www.musicbrainz.org) that is used to identify track and artist data on CDs as well as MP3, MP4, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC and other compressed files. Developed in the mid-1990s when the CDDB database became commercial, MusicBrainz was founded as an open system that allows registered users to update and edit the database. In a given week, more than a thousand users make edits, and by 2009, more than 400,000 had registered to do so.

Files are tagged with the Picard client application, which identifies songs by computing an acoustic fingerprint based on the MusicDNS technology and matching it against the MusicBrainz database. Other tagger applications, such as Magic MP3 Tagger and the Java-based Jaikoz, use the MetaBrainz database. See MusicDNS and music search.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MusicBrainz database can be searched on its Web site in a variety of ways.
The relational database at the heart of MusicBrainz is album-based and contains detailed metadata about artists (including composers and performers), tracks, audio track signatures, releases, and labels.
As a completely user-maintained and user-contributed database, MusicBrainz has instituted a style council to create and edit official style guidelines.
Originally following the model of CDDB, which was designed to handle pop/rock music in a now-typical artist/release/title structure, MusicBrainz has developed various iterations for handling classical music, though for the time being still shoehorns classical music into that structure.
With over 500,000 editors and nearly 11 million edits, MusicBrainz clearly has a significant user base.
MusicBrainz Picard works on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux systems and was tested for this review using Windows 7.
However, there is a very easy-to-follow, illustrated guide on the MusicBrainz Web site that walks one through the process of using the Picard tagger to clean up the metadata on one's audio files.
Though the process by which Picard achieves this feat is thoroughly explained in the MusicBrainz documentation, a synopsis is that Picard scans the audio file to create an audio fingerprint and tries to match the fingerprint to tracks and their related metadata in AmpliFIND's MusicDNS server, which is a database designed for acoustic recognition on the track level.
Clearly the whole idea behind MusicBrainz is that people will add their own information; however, if a new user is starting out with the Picard tagger to first clean up his or her files, this particular starting point doesn't lead to metadata creation very easily.
In addition to the sharing of music identification and metadata, MusicIP is proud to be donating 10% of revenue from the delivery of MusicBrainz data via MusicDNS back to the MetaBrainz Foundation to support their continued efforts," said Dr.
MusicBrainz is a user-maintained community music encyclopedia with volunteers from all over the world contributing information about music.
MusicBrainz now has two active partners in Relatable(R) and AgentArts, Inc.