Mutazilites

Mutazilites

 

founders of a rationalistic trend in early Muslim theology; the trend arose during the Arabian Caliphate in the eighth century. The original founder of Mutazilism is considered to be Wasil ibn Ata (699–748). The theoreticians of Mutazilism rejected many of the dogmas of orthodox Islam: the existence of attributes of god independent of him; anthropomorphism; and the dogma of the noncreatedness of the Koran, which regarded the Koran as merely one of the creations of god. The Mutazilites recognized the freedom of the human will and declared human reason to be the highest criterion for the norms of morality. The Mutazilites also attempted to reconcile classical dialectical-rationalistic thought with the fundamental principles of the Islamic world view.

REFERENCES

Beliaev, E. A. Musul’manskoe sektantstvo. Moscow, 1957.
Petrushevskii, I. P. Islam ν Irane ν VII-XV vekakh. Leningrad, 1966. Pages 203–13.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a movement called the Mutazilites, in which it said that God gave us reason so we should apply reason to live and not just following the scripture.
The Kharijites and Mutazilites wanted to preserve God's absolute power, while also maintaining human free will.
Missionary teachers and students relied on the Qur'an and borrowed from the 9th-century Mutazilites and the 18th-century Wahhabis to attack miraculous and intercessory elements in popular Sufi literature (174).
It is much debated by the two major schools of Muslim theology, the Mutazilites and the Asharites.
Influenced by Mutazilites, the Karaites insisted on belief in monotheism.
Reilly's specific comparison of the Mutazilites with the more traditionalist Asharites is grossly oversimplified and a historical.
1], then to introduce the first fully developed school of theology, the Mutazilites [who were advocates of reason, Ch.
Rational theology as presented by the Mutazilites, and Rational Philosophy presented by Averreos later, could be considered solid ground for tolerance.
The Mutazilites, I believe, looked to Greek philosophy to pursue a rational theology insisting on the demonstration of reason in religious belief).
Two schools of thought, popularly known as Mutazilites and Asharites, address this issue in greater details than others.
Qadarites or Mutazilites were opposed to Jabarites.
Some Sunni legal theorists and Mutazilites argued that this certainty was actually "discursive" (nazari) or "acquired" (muktasab) in nature--it was still total certainty, but only after some consideration of the reports did this inhere in the mind of the receiver.