Mutillidae


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Mutillidae

[myü′til·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The velvet ants, a family of hymenopteran insects in the superfamily Scolioidea.

Mutillidae

 

(velvet ants), a family of Aculeata. The males are winged, while the females are without wings and resemble ants. The body is highly chitinized. It is densely covered with black, red, golden, and white hairs, usually arranged in a spotted or banded pattern. There are about 3,000 species, which are distributed mainly in the tropics. The larvae parasitize the larvae of wasps and bees. Female Mutillidae invade the nests of insect hosts and deposit an egg on the adult larva. The Mutillidae larva then eats the host larva and pupates in its chamber. One species of Mutillidae parasitizes the pupae of the tsetse fly.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lynch Arribalzaga, new taxonomic changes and new distribution records for Neotropical Mutillidae (Hymenoptera), with notes on their biology.
Most of the Mutillidae species found in Cimarron Co.
Oklahoma has a high diversity of Mutillidae across the state but a low number of species recorded on a county-by-county basis and relatively low geographic overlap of species across neighboring counties.
First, counties with the highest diversity of recorded Mutillidae do not share a common habitat type, and therefore the assumption that they happen to share an unusually diverse habitat cannot be made.
Our data show that focused efforts to find, collect, and identify insects on a county-by-county wide basis yields the highest Mutillidae diversity, and a similar effort is likely to yield the highest return for investigating current distributions of these insects.
Using the baseline data from this study, our future goals are to carry out additional observational studies of behavior, host distributions and survey-work of Mutillidae across the state using a citizen-science project, Mutillidae of Oklahoma.
In conclusion, now that a baseline of historical data and a plan for establishing studies of Mutillidae in Oklahoma exists, it is possible to amplify additional county and state records of mutillid taxa and engage the public and students in experiments with these insects to understand their basic biology and how human activities impact the arthropod communities in Oklahoma through changes in land and water use.
C = Coleoptera; H = Hymenoptera Familia S Tenebrionidae(C) 30 Scarabaeidae (C) 16 Elateridae (C) 14 Mutillidae (H) 14 Carabidae (C) 11 Plumaridae (H) 9 Curculionidae (C) 8 Buprest idae (C) 7 Histeridae (C) 6 Anobidae (C) 3 Meloidae (C) 2 Tabla 3.
Of the 71 families registered, including insects and arachnids, Mutillidae (Hymenoptera) was the most numerous in number of specimens, followed by Scarabaeidae, Tenebrionidae and Elateridae (Coleoptera).