Mycenaean architecture

Mycenaean architecture

(1600–1200 B.C.)
The earliest phase was exemplified by masonry sidewalls and a timber roof. Monumental beehive-like tombs were constructed of superimposed layers of corbeled stones to create a parabolic vault. Stone-faced, inclined access passages led to the entrance, which had sloping jambs; overhead, a stone lintel which was supported by a characteristic triangular sculptured panel.

Mycenaean architecture

Architecture of the heroic age in southern Greece from the 17th to 13th century B.C. Exemplified in the earliest phase by shaft graves cut into the sloping rock, with sidewalls of stone masonry and a timber roof; in the middle period by monumental beehive tombs constructed of superimposed layers of enormous stone blocks progressively projecting to create a parabolic corbeled vault, with a stone-faced, inclined access passage leading to the entrance composed of upward-slanting jambs and a heavy stone lintel supporting a characteristic Mycenaean relief triangle; in the late period by fortified palaces having Cyclopean walls, underground passages with corbeled vaults, postern gates, and cisterns, laid out on an irregular ground plan, with distinctive propylaea, one or more unconnected columnar halls with porches facing individual courts, and long corridors linking auxiliary and storage rooms.