Mycenaean

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Mycenaean

1. of or relating to ancient Mycenae or its inhabitants
2. of or relating to the Aegean civilization of Mycenae (1400 to 1100bc)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Comparing the ancient DNA to more than 2,600 samples from modern Greeks proves the current population is close to the Mycenaeans genetically, but also has DNA from other early Stone Age ancestors.
While presenting her research at the Archaeological Institute of America's annual meeting, Hruby added that the society, which mysteriously collapsed around 1200 BC, mixed American clays to mimic Mycenaean clay and created two griddles and two souvlaki trays in the ancient style.
1), a claim immediately refuted by his ensuing discussion and closing statement: "At the very least, perhaps we can say that the Ahhiyawa Problem/Question has been solved and answered after all, for there is now little doubt that Ahhiyawa was a reference by the Hittites to some or all of the Bronze Age Mycenaean world.
Second, this literary evidence is sometimes enhanced by the ongoing archaeological excavations of both Troy and the Mycenaean citadels in Greece.
The Minoans and Mycenaeans were the chief civilisations of Bronze Age Greece, spanning the period from around 3000 BC to 1100 BC, when these cultures suffered a cataclysmic collapse.
The earliest and lowest levels include par t of the Mycenaean city wall and remains of pottery and bronze workshops (1300-1100BC).
56) Since a round, bronze-faced shield the size of a man would be uselessly broad and too heavy to carry, it is concluded that the poet is speaking here of large oblong shields without metal facing, such as were used in Mycenaean times.
Even the famous Mycenaeans, heroes of the Greek Trojan War, took up the Minoan way of war - adopting its weaponry, practices and ideologies.
A brief look at history shows that until 1960, when it became independent, Cyprus had a large number of foreign rulers: other than the Mycenaeans, the Phoenicians, the Assyrians, the Egyptians, the Persians, the Romans, the Byzantines, the Franks, the Venetians, the Ottomans and finally the British all placed their mark on the island.
Essential for archaeologists who study textiles, and of interest to readers interested in fiber arts, anthropology, and archaeology, this collection of 22 articles focuses on the specific terminology used to describe textiles and the elements of their material and manufacture in texts from the Ancient Near East, ancient Egypt, and the Mediterranean during the era of the Minoans, Hittites, and Mycenaeans.
He traces sport among the Hittites, Minoans, and Mycenaeans, and uses sport to trace elements of cultural contact and borrowing.
If these papers succeeded in characterizing a distinctive "Mycenaean" practice, that practice could be further defined by contrasting it with those from cultures in contact with the Mycenaeans.