Mycotoxicoses

Mycotoxicoses

 

diseases of animals caused by poisonous substances that have accumulated in fodders infested with toxic fungi. Mycotoxicoses appear suddenly and affect large numbers of animals; the diseases are not contagious and cease with a change of feed. The diseases may arise in the autumn or spring when the animals pasture on unharvested overwintered grasses and frozen vegetation. Stabled animals may be affected by my cotoxicoses if they are fed vegetable feeds that have been stored in humid places.

The severity and clinical manifestations of mycotoxicoses depend on the amount of toxin that has entered the body, the duration of its intake, and the species and age characteristics of the macroorganism. Mycotoxicoses that have been studied have been separated as independent nosologic units and are named according to the genus of the fungus that causes the intoxication.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sherry and Rogers (2003) reported that [alpha]-LA is a potential agent to protect against mycotoxins and treat mycotoxicoses such as mushroom poisoning.
Mold mycelium is also dangerous and is associated with mycosis and mycotoxicoses.
Plant poisoning and mycotoxicoses of importance in horses in southern Africa.
Well documented human mycotoxicoses include ergotism [7], alimentary toxic aleukia [8], Balkan endemic nephropathy and acute aflatoxicoses [9].
Mycotoxicoses are diseases caused by the ingestion of mycotoxins by man and animals, largely through the consumption of contaminated foodstuffs.
Mycotoxins comprise a structurally diverse family of naturally occurring fungal toxins elaborated by several species of fungi, which cause mycotoxicosis in single or mycotoxicoses in mixed conditions.
Effect of polyherbal feed supplement "Growell" during induced aflatoxicosis, ochratoxicosis and combined mycotoxicoses in broilers.
Thus the aim of this review is to provide a description of the major mycotoxin contaminants in grains, to describe methods of analysis and prevention that can reduce mycotoxicoses, and to discuss how mycotoxins relate directly to the swine industry.
This is due to their production of mycotoxins (naturally occurring toxic chemical often of aromatic structure) compounds which are capable of including mycotoxicoses in man following ingestion or inhalation.
At present, the most potent dietary approach to prevent mycotoxicoses in poultry is the use of adsorbents (Surai, 2005).
This is the major reason for the difficulty of diagnosing mycotoxicoses.
Clay enterosorbent has been used in feeds for counteracting mycotoxicoses in farm animals for several decades (Mayura et al.