Mycotrophic Plants

Mycotrophic Plants

 

plants that form mycorrhizae and obtain nutrient substances from the soil by means of the fungi that inhabit their roots. Most plant species are mycotrophic (except certain annuals, sedges, horsetails, club mosses, and aquatic plants). There are three groups of mycotrophic plants: plants that cannot develop from seeds without infestation of the fungus-symbiont (Orchidaceae); plants that can grow without a mycorrhiza but develop considerably better with parasitism by fungi (many trees, shrubs, and subshrubs); and plants that often have a mycorrhiza but develop equally as well without the fungus when nutritional conditions are favorable (linden, birch, many shrubs).

References in periodicals archive ?
1985) found fungal structures in roots of Equisetum species growing in a sand dune habitat, the close association of the Equisetum roots with roots of characteristically mycotrophic plants raised the possibility that the observed fungal structures represented "simply the penetration [of Equisetum roots by] a 'non-host" (Read et al.
For completeness, he mentioned parasitic plants and mycotrophic plants, which rely on mycorrhizal fungi to pass them materials from a woody plant.
Host preference among AM fungi has been reported by earlier workers [22,12], hence, the need for inoculating different mycotrophic plants has been stressed [17,4].