Mygalomorphae

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Mygalomorphae

[‚mig·ə·lō′mȯr‚fē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A suborder of spiders (Araneida) including American tarantulas, trap-door spiders, and purse-web spiders; the tarantulas may attain a leg span of 10 inches (25 centimeters).

Mygalomorphae

 

a suborder of large spiders. The trunk and legs are hairy; each chelicera is subchelate and has an opening for the poison gland at the tip. The spiders, which are distributed in the tropics, hunt at night for insects, small frogs and lizards, and, sometimes, small birds. The most characteristic species are A vicularia avicularia, which is black and reaches a length of 5 cm, and Selenocosmia javanensis, which is reddish brown and reaches a length of 10 cm.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Defensive behaviors in mygalomorph spiders: release of urticating hairs by some Aviculariinae (Araneae, Theraphosidae).
Tarantulas are the largest spiders in the world, belonging to the order Mygalomorph, which includes tarantulas, trapdoor spiders, and other less well-known groups.
This is a tribute to his contribution to studies on Indian mygalomorph spiders.
Although, Gravely (1915, 1935) in his publications on Indian mygalomorph spiders included the genus Conothele Thorell 1878 based on a few unidentified specimens in the Indian Museum (now Zoological Survey of India), the genus was never formally described nor any species listed from India.
Combining genetics and geospatial analyses to infer population extinction in mygalomorph spiders endemic to the Los Angeles region.
No other reports about spiderling emergence are available for most mygalomorph families.
First Mesozoic mygalomorph spiders from the Lower Cretaceous of Siberia and Mongolia, with notes on the system and evolution of the infraorder Mygalomorphae (Chelicerata: Araneae).
This aggressive behavior is not commonly reported for mygalomorph spiders (Jackson & Pollard 1990; Shillington & Verrel 1997).
A revision of the funnel-web mygalomorph spider subfamily Ischnothelinae (Araneae, Dipluridae).
Few studies have been conducted on the reproductive behavior of tarantulas in general (Baerg 1958; Minch 1979), and the small amount of published literature that contains detailed behavioral descriptions (Shillington & Verrel 1997; Jackson & Pollard 1990) suggests that the traditional portrayal of mygalomorph display behavior as "simple" (Platnick 1971; Foelix 1996) is misleading.