Myron

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Myron

(mī`rən), fl. 5th cent. B.C., Greek sculptor. He is supposed to have been a pupil of Ageladas of Argos, but he worked largely in Athens. Sculpting in bronze, he was noted for his animals (of which no examples have survived) and for his athletes in action. His works are known through descriptions by ancient writers, such as Pliny and Pausanias, and two of them by copies, the Discobolus [Gr.,=discus thrower], the best copy of which is the Lancelotti Discobolus in Rome (Terme Mus.), and Athena and Marsyas, of which there are also Roman copies.

Myron

 

Ancient Greek sculptor of the mid-fifth century B.C. He was born in Eleutherae (on the border between Boeotia and Attica) and worked in Athens. Myron’s works, which were executed primarily in bronze, have not survived and are known only from the works of ancient writers and from Roman marble copies.

An important representative of early classical art, Myron gradually overcame the rigidity of archaic art and demonstrated particular interest in the depiction of figures at the climactic moment of an action. Revealing the element of dynamic tension in the harmony of the human body, he showed the beauty of athletic action (for example, Discobolus, or The Discus Thrower, Terme Museum, Rome) and intelligent will restraining unbridled impulse (the group Athena and Marsyas). According to ancient epigrams, Myron’s statue of a cow, which impressed contemporaries with its lifelikeness, enjoyed particular popularity. Myron was also a master of the metal-working arts. He produced vessels with pictures carved in relief.

REFERENCES

Waldhauer, O. F. Miron. Berlin-Petrograd-Moscow, 1923. [Sokolov, G.] Miron Poliklet. Moscow, 1961. (Album.)
Poulsen, V. H. “Myron: Ein stilkritischer Versuch.” In Acta archaeologica, vol. 11. Copenhagen, 1940.

Myron

Greek sculptor (5th century B.C.) of Discobolus and other works acclaimed for extraordinary lifelikeness. [Gk. Art: NCE, 1870]

Myron

5th century bc, Greek sculptor. He worked mainly in bronze and introduced a greater variety of pose into Greek sculpture, as in his Discobolus