Mysterious Stranger, The

Mysterious Stranger, The

devil appears as a pleasant stranger, convinces a boy of the falseness of morals and the nonexistence of God. [Am. Lit.: Twain The Mysterious Stranger in Benét, 697]
See: Devil

Mysterious Stranger, The

naive youth is convinced by the devil that morals are false, God doesn’t exist, and there is no heaven or hell. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 697]
References in periodicals archive ?
As Leah finds herself drawn to this mysterious stranger, the outside world shifts, too: Her brother's best friend starts making romantic overtures toward her, and her mother's perpetually odd behavior becomes stranger than usual.
This, bare possibility does much to explain the most thoroughly disputed element of the Paine-Duneka version of The Mysterious Stranger, the ending.
The farther one proceeds into The Mysterious Stranger, the more insistently it challenges the boys' (and readers') faith in humanity given the bulk of the evidence.