Mytilus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Mytilus

 

(marine mussels), a genus of bivalve mollusks. The shell is cuneate-oval. With the aid of a byssus, marine mussels attach themselves to the hard substratum or to other mollusks (forming beds). The mantle cavity permits water circulation, which is essential for breathing and for the entrance of food particles. Large representatives of Mytilus may have an ingoing current of 70 l in a day. Food particles move with the water current into the mouth opening; at the same time, other substances are expelled in the exhalent current. In this way the mussels clean the water of suspended particles, which subsequently settle to the bottom.

Mussels of the genus Mytilus are widely distributed in temperate and tropical waters of the world ocean. The edible mussel Mytilus edulis, which is widespread in temperate and subtropical waters of the northern hemisphere, forms extensive colonies and is among the fouling organisms that attach themselves to under-water installations and the bottom of ships. The meat of marine mussels is edible in cooked or canned form. A high-quality feed mix for poultry is prepared from mussels. Certain species of Mytilus can be bred artificially.

REFERENCE

Rukovodstvo po zoologii, vol. 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1940.

O. A. SKARLOTO

References in periodicals archive ?
Copper bioavailability and toxicity to Mytilus galloprovincialis in Shelter Island Yacht Basin, San Diego, CA," Mar.
2008 Effects of ocean acidification on the immune response of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.
The duration of larval life of Mytilus edulis ranges from about one to four weeks, being a function of temperature, salinity, food supply, and other factors.
Searching for a source of strong waterproof glue, Department of Energy scientists have synthesized, or artificially created, the protein Mytilus galloprovincialis (MIT-uh-lis gal-uh-proh-vinchee-AH-lis), which sea mussels use to attach themselves to corals.
THE very mention of pulling a mussel is enough to send the sporty types into a tizz, but fear not as we embark on a Mytilus Edulis (mussel) tour.
In two studies, Fisher and his colleagues examined the concentrations of seven coastal pollutants in two common, closely related mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and M.
Through laboratory and field investigations we have examined the effects of lipophilic contaminants on the seasonal cycle of lipid accumulation and allocation to gamete production in Mytilus edulis.
In mussel Mytilus edulis, cadmium was proved as a strong inducer for the expression of the two MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20), whereas zinc stress only gave a compromised stimulating effect (Barsyte et al.
A decrease in protein contents was reported in several bivalve species, as Mytilus galloprovincialis, Perna perna and Ruditapes decussatus from polluted sites [32,14,23].