nitrous oxide

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nitrous oxide

or

nitrogen (I) oxide,

chemical compound, N2O, a colorless gas with a sweetish taste and odor. Its density is 1.977 grams per liter at STP. It is soluble in water, alcohol, ether, and other solvents. Although it does not burn, it supports combustion since it decomposes into oxygen and nitrogen when heated. The gas is prepared commercially by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3, at about 240°C; to produce nitrous oxide and water; the reaction must be carefully controlled to prevent explosive decomposition of the nitrous oxide. The gas is purified, liquified by compressing and cooling it, and stored in metal cylinders. A major use of nitrous oxide is in anesthesia, e.g., in dentistry. It is commonly called laughing gas since it produces euphoria and mirth when inhaled in small amounts. It is also used in making certain canned pressurized foods, e.g., instant whipped cream. Nitrous oxide was discovered (1772) by Joseph Priestley, who called it "diminished nitrous air"; he prepared it from "nitrous air" (nitric oxide, NO) by treatment with iron powder or a mixture of iron and sulfur powders. Its properties were further studied (1799) by Sir Humphry DavyDavy, Sir Humphry,
1778–1829, English chemist and physicist. The son of a woodcarver, he received his early education at Truro and was apprenticed (1795) to a surgeon-apothecary at Penzance.
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Nitrous Oxide

 

laughing gas, one of the oxides of nitrogen. It is used as medicine in a mixture with oxygen to induce inhalation narcosis in surgical operations and childbirth, and sometimes in myocardial infarction. It was called laughing gas by the English chemist H. Davy, who, while experimenting on himself to study the effect of nitrous oxide (1799), observed excitation in the initial phase, accompanied by laughter and chaotic body movements, and, in the following phase, unconsciousness.

nitrous oxide

[′nī·trəs ′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
N2O Colorless, sweet-tasting gas, boiling at -90°C; slightly soluble in water, soluble in alcohol; used as a food aerosol, and as an anesthetic in dentistry and surgery. Also known as laughing gas; nitrogen monoxide.

nitrous oxide

a colourless nonflammable slightly soluble gas with a sweet smell: used as an anaesthetic in dentistry and surgery. Formula: N2O
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