Vision for Space Exploration

(redirected from NASA Authorization Act of 2005)

Vision for Space Exploration

NASA's main plan for its future and the future of US space exploration in the early 21st century. It emerged in a speech made by President George W. Bush on Jan. 14 2004, in which he ‘set a new course for America's space program.’ The Vision program outlined a ‘building-block’ strategy of human and robotic missions, commencing with the return of the space shuttle to regular service following the loss of Columbia in Feb. 2003 and the completion of the International Space Station. The program calls for the return of humans to the Moon by 2020 and seeks to pave the way for human missions to explore Mars and beyond.
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The NASA Authorization Act of 2005 declared it to be U.
The NASA Authorization Act of 2005 mandated an Academy review of each division of NASA's science directorate every five years.
The NASA Authorization Act of 2005 directed NASA to carry out "a balanced set of programs," including human space flight in accordance with the Vision, but also aeronautics R&D and scientific research, the latter to include robotic missions and research not directly related to human exploration.
In the NASA Authorization Act of 2005, Congress directed NASA to use the personnel, capabilities, assets, and infrastructure of the shuttle program "to the fullest extent possible consistent with a successful development program" in developing the vehicles now known as Orion, Ares I, and Ares V.
The NASA Authorization Act of 2005 required NASA to allocate at least 15% of the funds budgeted to ISS research to "life and microgravity science research that is not directly related to supporting the human exploration program.
142) In the NASA Authorization Act of 2005, Congress established requirements for baselines and cost controls.
The NASA Authorization Act of 2005 directs NASA to establish a program to develop a sustained human presence on the Moon, which will serve as a stepping stone to further exploration of Mars and other destinations.
A new section expresses the sense of the Congress that NASA should participate in competitiveness initiatives within the spending levels authorized in the NASA Authorization Act of 2005 and allows NASA to establish a virtual academy to train its employees.
The Report was submitted to Congress last week in response to direction outlined in Section 507 of the NASA Authorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-155).
109-155, NASA Authorization Act of 2005, December 30, 2005.
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