NET Act


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NET Act

(No Electronic Theft Act) U.S. Federal legislation passed in December 1997 that covers illegal distribution of software over the Internet. Anybody uploading copyrighted software to a website and posting its availability is liable for prosecution. ISPs are also liable if they have been warned to close down a Web page and do not comply. Penalties include up to 10 years in prison and a USD $250,000 fine. In August 1999, a 22-year-old university student was the first person convicted under the NET Act of making copyrighted software, music recordings and movies available to the general public. See software piracy and SIIA.
References in periodicals archive ?
1998, at 37 (criticizing NET Act for absence of fair- use exemptions).
136) Accordingly, the NET Act allowed "the prosecution of individuals who willfully violated copyright laws without apparent profit objectives under felony provisions of the Copyright Act.
The Health Care Safety Net Act of 2008 directed GAO to report on IDSs that serve underserved populations--those that are uninsured or medically underserved (i.
The House had earlier passed the moratorium separately as the Protecting Medicaid Safety Net Act of 2008, H.
to support the Protecting the Medicaid Safety Net Act of 2008, H.
2) Big business entities including the software, record, and movie industries, lobbied Congress to pass the NET Act to close the "LaMacchia Loophole.
EVEN the old guard of cartoons is getting in on the Net act - Stan Lee, who helped create Spiderman, the Fantastic Four, The Incredible Hulk and others, will be introducing his first new team of toon superheroes in 25 years on a new website claimed to be "the largest community site for 10 to 20 year olds".
The Health Care Safety Net Act of 2008 required that we study the economic costs and benefits of SBHCs.
The House of Representatives passed the Preserving the Medicaid Safety Net Act of 2008 (H.
January 1998, the effective date of the NET Act, criminal copyright
Recently, a student at the University of Oregon became the first person criminally charged under the Net Act for software piracy violations over the Internet.