Perseus A

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Perseus A

See Perseus cluster.

Perseus A

[′pər·sē·əs ′ā]
(astronomy)
A strong radio source, having a redshift z = 0.018 and centered on the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275, that undergoes extremely violent outbursts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even as we're taking in, say, NGC 1275, a galaxy about 225 million light-years away, an observer there could be admiring the supercontinent Pangaea, which existed on our planet 225 million years ago.
Bonning and Shields propose that this galaxy, NGC 1275, is the product of a merger of two galaxies whose black holes were each about 10 billion times the mass of the sun.
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope sees NGC 1275, the core member of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, as a source of high-energy gamma rays, but the earlier Compton mission did not.
The host galaxy is NGC 1275, a giant elliptical behemoth that's detectable in a 6-inch telescope even though it lies 240 million light-years away.
The Hubble images suggest that cluster birth may be a consequence of the merger process, says Holtzman, who has conducted similar research on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1275 (SN: 1/25/92, p.
Superimposed on NGC 1275 (from our point of view) is a smaller spiral galaxy, or "high-velocity system," that's being torn apart as it dashes "headlong" towards the massive elliptical.
Ten times larger and thousands of times more luminous than the elderly, densely star-packed regions that surround our Milky Way, bigger and brighter than the young, giant clusters that Hubble found in the elliptical galaxy NGC 1275 (SN: 4/6/91, p.
Its brightest member is NGC 1275, also called Perseus A--a designation that flags its copious emission at radio wavelengths.
But a new Hubble image reveals that 50 globular clusters in NGC 1275 radiate intense blue light, a signature of recent starbirth.
At the center of the cluster lies the giant galaxy NGC 1275, which harbors a supermassive black hole that emits two giant jets of plasma.
Abell 426 is ruled by its brightest member, the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275, also known as Perseus A.
Similarly, over in Perseus, a full-page photograph of the Perseus I galaxy cluster enables the user of a large-aperture telescope to look for the 37 galaxies in the immediate vicinity of NGC 1275.