NMR


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NMR:

see magnetic resonancemagnetic resonance,
in physics and chemistry, phenomenon produced by simultaneously applying a steady magnetic field and electromagnetic radiation (usually radio waves) to a sample of atoms and then adjusting the frequency of the radiation and the strength of the magnetic field
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NMR

References in periodicals archive ?
Superconducting magnets generate the strong magnetic fields needed for NMR measurements.
Application of modern NMR methods in organic chemistry, inorganic and physical.
The company also introduced its first cryogenic flow-injection NMR probe for LC-NMR and LC-SPE-NMR.
16%; FT-IR (Neat, cm-1): 3091, 1772, 1736, 1616, 1490, 1262, 1133, 1014; 1H- NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3,d/ppm): 1.
The world of organic chemistry is the principle benefactor for the advent of benchtop NMR spectrometers.
All the compounds were characterized by FT-IR, 31P, 15N, 1H and13C NMR spectroscopic techniques.
Benchtop NMR instruments typically process samples in 45 seconds to a minute, compared to wet chemistry methods that can take from 6 hours to a day.
In a recent experiment conducted at the University of California, Berkeley, the NMR chip detected magnetic signals in tap water flowing through minuscule channels etched in silicon.
Cryogenic NMR probes cool the sample to very lower temperatures, which decreases analysis time.
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows scientists to see fine details of molecular structure by placing a molecular sample into an ultra-high magnetic field created by the NMR magnet.
Performance of NMR spectrometers greatly depends on homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field.
Now, scientists in Germany have performed NMR analysis using the biggest and cheapest magnet of all--Earth.