NPS


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NPS

(Net Promoter Score) A metric used by an organization to gauge customer loyalty by asking a single question: "How likely are you to recommend our product to a friend on a scale of 0 to 10?" A 9 or 10 is assigned to "Promoters," who will probably be good customers, while people scoring 0 to 6 are "Detractors" and less likely. "Passives" are 7 and 8. After subtracting the percentage of Detractors from the percentage of Promoters, the NPS score can range from +100 to -100.

NPS

On drawings, abbr. for “nominal pipe size.”
References in periodicals archive ?
Shri Akhilesh Kumar, Deputy General Manager, gave a detailed presentation on NPS and informed the participants about the features, benefits and the process of joining NPS to the employees as well as to the employer.
International Executive Committee (IEC): Our international students have a voice at NPS.
We want to get a handle on what causes the variation," adds lain McIntosh of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, who is leading a study of people with NPS.
Netezza announced yesterday the extension of its NPS 10000 Series product family http://www.
To learn more about NPS, please contact Angie Commorato at 317-558-3834.
The NPS system also provides analysis of resource information, so when future events arise the organization can better understand volunteer preferences, aiding in the assignment of resources to cover chapter needs.
The complaint charges NPS and certain of its officers and directors with violations of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
If you purchased NPS securities during the Class Period, you may, no later than September 11, 2006, move to be appointed as a Lead Plaintiff in this class action.
The NPS system gives retailers the ability to execute comprehensive market basket, clickstream, CRM, multi-channel inventory, supply chain, merchandising and sales data analysis in real-time.
The high-performance NPS family now includes three product lines, scaling from a few hundred gigabytes to 100 terabytes, to address a broader range of data sizes, workloads and customer requirements.