NSFnet


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NSFNET

NSFnet

(National Science Foundation NETwork) The network funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, which linked five supercomputer sites across the country in the mid-1980s. Universities were also allowed to connect to it. In 1988, it was upgraded from its original 56 Kbps lines to T1 circuits. By the early 1990s, NSFnet was using a T3 backbone and served as the primary Internet backbone until 1995, when the Net became commercialized. See ARPAnet.
References in periodicals archive ?
We show the 2-hop away SD pair case for the Ring topology in Fig 14, the 2-hop away SD pair case for the NSFNET topology in Fig 15.
The NSFNET backbone at the top of the hierarchy was replaced by a series of private backbone providers that interconnected with one another at four public network access points established by the National Science Foundation.
Gore enters the picture a bit later - in 1987, when he supported a drive by universities to expand funding for NSFNet.
Formed in 1966, Merit Network is leveraging its experience managing the precursor to the modern Internet, the NSFNET, and its participation in US Ignite will add to a lineage of innovation as Merit continues to support leading-edge network technology in Michigan and beyond.
In this role, Wolff led the development of NSFNET, which eventually became commercialized into the Internet of today.
DARPANET had not yet become NSFNET, let alone the Internet, and data exchange protocols were far in the future.
39) By the 1980s, NSF's vision was fulfilled when some of the systems on NSFnet went public.
In the 1980s, the National Science Foundation created the NSFNET for the university research community.
The National Science Foundation, which provided infrastructure support for this network of networks through its NSFNET program since 1985, has began gradually eliminating such funding over the next five years.
In the United States, for example, NSFnet was at T3 speeds two years ago.
If this trend continues, more parts of the Internet, such as the NSFNET, may be turned over to the private sector.
This network forms the backbone of NSFNET, which also has links with ARPANET and several NASA laboratories.