Nadab and Abihu


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Nadab and Abihu

destroyed by God for offering Him “alien fire.” [O.T.: Leviticus 10:1–3]
References in periodicals archive ?
The reason for the sudden death of Nadab and Abihu remains one of the Torah's most perplexing mysteries.
Now Aaron's sons Nadab and Abihu each took his fire pan, put fire in it, and laid incense on it; and they offered before the Lord alien fire, which He had not enjoined upon them.
To determine the exact nature of the infraction of Nadab and Abihu requires more probing.
Milgrom suggests that "the Nadab and Abihu account may serve as a polemic against paganism--the offering of incense in private idolatrous cults.
2) It explains why no detail is given about what Nadab and Abihu did or did not do to cause their sudden extermination when fire "came forth from the Lord's presence and consumed them" (Lev 10:2); it sufficed simply to point out that they had done what the Lord (or Moses) had not authorized (10:1).
The danger is noted also in the story of Nadab and Abihu who offered "unholy fire" and were consumed by fire (10:1-2).
The deaths of Nadab and Abihu are recapitulated in 1 Kings 14-15 with the deaths of King Jeroboam's sons.
Fishbane suggests that the linkage between the death of Uzzah, on the one hand, and Nadab and Abihu on the other hand, is the effect of different religious modalities, the death of Uzzah exemplifying the death and destruction that may result when religious worship is overly physical, whereas the deaths of Nadab and Abihu represent the ideal of self-renunciation, the figure of David in the narrative offering a middle way.
The Midrash suggests that God refrained from burning the tunics of Nadab and Abihu in order not to humiliate them by exposing their nakedness publicly (Sipra Shemini Millu'im 22-27).
The priests represented by Nadab and Abihu failed to exert their claim.
For example, as noted above, the story of Nadab and Abihu is thought to reflect a controversy between priests competing to make incense offerings on censers in the sanctuary's most holy place.
P's story of Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10) is completely ignored.