Nagoi

Nagoi

 

a family of Russian nobles known in Tver’ from the end of the 13th century and in Moscow from the end of the 15th century.

In the 16th and early 17th centuries, nine of the Nagois were boyars. Mariia Fedorovna Nagaia, who died in 1612, became the seventh wife of Ivan IV the Terrible in 1581 and was the mother of Tsarevich Dmitrii Ivanovich. After Dmitrii’s death she entered a convent under the name of Marfa. In 1605 she “recognized” the First False Dmitrii to be her own son, somehow saved by a miracle. The Nagoi family died out in the mid-17th century.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for proposed 11KV underground railway crossing at village Kuteshar Nagoi as per Railway Chainage No.
In 1571 Ivan wrote to Fedor Andreevich Pisemskii and Afanasii Fedorovich Nagoi in Crimea that "now you are neither in the 'land' nor in the oprichnina" (este ni v zemskom, ni v oprishnine), but when they returned to Moscow, they would be well received.
49) Although it apparently had no influence on the developments, it is interesting to note that the Nagoi were of Danish extraction.
The archimandrite ordered them to be arrested and chained and to escort their leader, Ivashka Nagoi (Naked Johnny), to his cell.
After their meeting, the archimandrite had Nagoi jailed and went to see the patriarch to tell him what had transpired.
Whatever the identity of the man--Otrep'ev, a Nagoi plant, or the real son of Ivan the Terrible--Dunning finds him to be a "remarkable person" (156).
He observes that the marginal corrections, which are usually considered to reflect badly on Ivan's Staritskii cousins, also implicitly criticize the Zakhar'in-Iur'ev-Romanovs, the clan of Ivan's first wife and Fedor's mother, and Fedor Nagoi, a relative of Ivan's last wife (the mother of Dmitrii)--an insight he credits to Amosov (257).