Nahman of Bratslav

Nahman of Bratslav

(näkh`mən, brät`släf), 1772–1810, Jewish Hasidic leader, the great-grandson of the Baal-Shem-TovBaal-Shem-Tov
, c.1698–1760, Jewish founder of modern Hasidism, b. Ukraine. His life is the subject of many tales that circulated even before his death. Originally named Israel ben Eliezer, he is said to have been born of elderly, poor parents and to have been orphaned at
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. His messianic pretensions put him in conflict with other Hasidic (see HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
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) leaders. Nahman differed from other Hasidim by his consciousness of God's absence from the world, and his concern about sin. He told stories to convey the struggle against evil and for redemption. After his death, his followers did not choose a new leader, but continue to revere him to this day.

Bibliography

See his tales, tr. and ed. by A. Band (1980); biography by A. Green (1979).

References in periodicals archive ?
81) Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav, quoted in Arthur Green, Tormented Master: The Life and Spiritual Quest of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, Jewish Lights Publications, 1992, p.
Who else but Leviant could combine Reb Nahman of Bratslav and Beethoven (e.
They are, first, the leading maskil (enlightener) Naftali Hertz Wessely (1725-1805) who lived in the northern trading cities: Hamburg, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Berlin and, second, the Hasidic mystic, Nahman of Bratslav (1772-1810), who spent most of his days, except for a journey to Palestine in 1798-99, in relative small market towns in the Ukraine.
For a detailed, authoritative biography of Nahman of Bratzlav see Arthur Green, Tormented Master: A life of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav (University: University of Alabama Press, 1979).
This is the essence of devotional repentance in the thought of the early nineteenth-century Hasidic master Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav.
They concern themselves with religious themes and issues, in sharp contrast to Sholem Aleichem's lack of attraction to "the Bible, the midrashim, the medieval romance, the stories of Nahman of Bratslav, and of Shivhei Ha-Besht [Praises of the Baal-Shem-Tov].
In his translation of the Tales of Nahman of Bratslav, Arnold Band relates the contention of Yosef Dan and Mendel Piekarz that "whereas the telling of tales had previously been frowned upon by Jewish authorities, it was regarded as a worthy pastime by Hasidic masters.