Nahmanides


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Nahmanides

(nähmän`ĭdēz), 1194–c.1270, Jewish scholar, exegete, and kabbalist, b. Spain. He wrote commentaries on the Hebrew Bible and the Talmud. A mystic, he rejected part of Maimonides' philosophy but recognized his greatness. He wrote an account of his disputation with the anti-Jewish agitator Pablo Christiani, which took place in the presence of King James I of Aragón. In 1267, Nahmanides settled in Palestine. He is also called Rabbi Moses Ben Nahman (abbreviated to Ramban).

Bibliography

See C. B. Chavel, Ramban (1960).

References in periodicals archive ?
Nahmanides, while not following Maimonides' five-part division of the opinions in the Book of Job, nonetheless considers the first four opinions to exhaust the possibilities which the human intellect can supply, which are in fact only two: the denial of providence (Job, whose opinion Nahmanides identifies with that of Epicurus) and the belief that suffering is a just punishment for human sin (Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar).
From its geniuses--Maimonides, Nahmanides, and Yehudah Halevi--to its bankers, doctors, scholars, artists, merchants, husbands, wives, and children, Judaism has survived persecution and oppression and made significant contributions to the modern world, argues Schama, because of its adherents' devotion to the written word.
In their classic commentaries, Ibn Ezra (3) and Nahmanides (4) point to a more successful realization of the Three-Day Plan.
Maimonides, the great twelfth century rationalist literally worshipped a different God than Nahmanides, the pivotal thirteenth century kabbalist, yet no one today would doubt the Jewishness of both, or question the seminal importance of each in the development of authentic Jewisl thought.
The reasoning behind this verse, writes 13th-century scholar Nahmanides, is to protect the species that God created, as well as their ability to procreate.
An example of a core value still relevant today can be found in the Jewish tradition in a document that we used to teach from the thirteenth century called "The Holy Letter" (Iggeret Ha-Kodesh in Hebrew), which is attributed to Nahmanides.
Revised from presentations at that event, 15 essays explore such topics as Rashi and Maimonides on Torah and the cosmos, Maimonides in Nahmanides and his school, the first crusade narrative of R.
Bava Kamma 10:4 (if a worker or a poor person climbs a tree at a time when this is the practice, then they are exempt from breaking a booth in the process); Nahmanides, NOVELLEA, commentary to B.
Eight hundred years ago, Rabbi Moshe Ben-Nahman, called Nahmanides, coined the phrase "Scoundrel with the permission of the Torah," meaning a person who does despicable things which are not expressly forbidden in the Bible.
800 years ago, Rabbi Moshe Ben-Nahman, called Nahmanides, coined the phrase "Scoundrel with the permission of the Torah" -- meaning a person who does despicable things which are not expressly forbidden in the Bible.
There were examples of individual cases of aliyah to Israel--the medieval Jewish thinker and rabbinic leader Nahmanides comes to mind--but there was never an attempt until the modern period to establish Jewish sovereignty in Israel.
Nahmanides, a fourteenth-century rabbi, additionally bases this duty to care for the sick on Lev.