onychia

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Related to Nail disease: median nail dystrophy

onychia

[ō′nik·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the nail matrix.
References in periodicals archive ?
15 However, it was observed that individuals with diabetes had more extensive nail disease, with involvement of both toenails and fingernails seen in 54.
Trials with antiTNF agents have shown substantial benefit in all clinical domains of PsA, including arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, psoriasis, nail disease, and patient reported domains, such as pain, fatigue, function, and quality of life.
The product is utilised to treat nail disease and is also sold under the names Naloc/Nalox and Emtrix.
Comprehensive treatment of PsA involves assessment of and focus on each of the heterogeneous clinical domains of the disease, including arthritis (synovitis), enthesitis (inflamed attachment sites to bone of tendons, ligaments, and joint capsule fibers), dactylitis (swelling of a whole digit), spondylitis (potentially involving sacroiliac joints and vertebrae), psoriasis, and nail disease.
Questions and physical examination focus on collecting data to determine the more likely of the two diagnoses, psoriasis and fungal nail disease.
The patients were examined including personal particulars, detailed history, duration of skin and nail disease and treatment taken.
Patients with psoriatic arthritis taking methotrexate demonstrated an improvement in peripheral joint disease, skin disease, enthesitis, dactylitis, and nail disease over a period of 12 weeks in a subanalysis of methotrexate users in the TICOPA study.
According to the contract, Moberg Pharma has offered Menarini Asia-Pacific the exclusive rights to market and sell Kerasal Nail, a prescription-free, over-the-counter drug used to treat nail disease, in eight Southeast Asian countries.
However, this is no longer considered the ideal practice, given what is now known about the potential clinical sequelae of onychomycosis, the importance of selecting the most appropriate treatment, and the possibility of misdiagnosis of nail disease from other causes (such as immune dysfunction (8) or psoriasis (9)).
Lasers for nail disease have been approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
According to an evidence review that he and his associates in GRAPPA published in 2009, biologies (anti-tumor necrosis factor inhibitors) as a group were found to be effective in all five domains of the disease: peripheral arthritis, skin and nail disease, axial disease, dactylitis, and enthesitis, while the oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were effective for peripheral arthritis and skin and nail disease.