Namier


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Namier

Sir Lewis Bernstein, original name Ludwik Bernsztajn vel Niemirowski. 1888--1960, British historian, born in Poland: noted esp for his studies of 18th-century British politics
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The references to the minutiae of George III and the grass roots of Jacksonian democracy were thinly veiled swipes at the British historian Sir Lewis Namier and the American historian Lee Benson, and at political history in general.
2) During the 1950s and early 1960s, what passed for English social history was redolent with the elitist parliamentary prosopographies of Lewis Namier.
However polemical his intent on occasion, Butterfield displayed--nowhere more than in his 1957 study George III and the Historians, originating in an En counter article--consistent fairness to opponents, notably the once celebrated Sir Lewis Namier, who compounded the disastrous effects of his rampant science-envy with his imprudent assumption that scientists included Marx and Freud.
Like Sir Lewis Namier in 1848: The Revolution of the Intellectuals.
The revolution was initiated in Britain by scholars like Sir Lewis Namier in such books as The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III (1929) and focused on methodology.
A few comments: it is odd to write about eighteenth-century Parliaments without mentioning Namier.
His most famous work, a critique of The Whig Interpretation of History (1931), led Annabel Patterson to associate him with the Tory views of Lewis Namier and David Hume.
From Alfred Plummer and Lewis Namier to Christopher Hill and J.
Local Jay Namier said: "Then there was a terrific boom.
This is attributed to the historian Sir Lewis Namier and cited in Roger Hackett, "Japan.
The literature on twentieth-century historians is even richer, including recent studies of Herbert Butterfield and Lewis Namier (two opponents in the study of the eighteenth century, featured here in a chapter that offers a marvellously illuminating case study of the different roads to "modernity"), David Cannadine's biography of G.
His question brought to mind the cruel saying of the great historian Sir Lewis Namier that, since the fifteenth century, no Italian army, has ever beaten anything apart from another Italian army.