Nantucket

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Nantucket

(năntŭk`ĭt), island, c.14 mi (23 km) long, from 3 to 6 mi (4.8–9.6 km) wide, SE Mass., lying c.25 mi (40 km) S of Cape Cod, from which it is separated by Nantucket Sound. Muskeget Channel is located between Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard to the west. Exhibiting evidence of glaciation (terminal moraine, outwash plain), Nantucket has sandy beaches and low, rolling hills composed of sand and gravel. It is sparsely vegetated; wild cranberries, heather, and wild roses predominate. Nantucket and the small adjacent islands constitute both Nantucket town and Nantucket co. Settled in 1659, the island was part of New York from 1660 to 1692, when it was ceded to Massachusetts. Nantucket was a major whaling port until the decline of the industry (c.1850), and it later developed into a well-known resort and artists' colony. The village of Nantucket is the trade center of the island and is known for its many old houses. The island has a whaling museum and an 18th-century windmill. The first U.S. lightship station (est. 1856) is located near Nantucket.

Nantucket

an island off SE Massachusetts: formerly a centre of the whaling industry; now a resort. Length: nearly 24 km (15 miles). Width: 5 km (3 miles). Pop. (county and town): 10 724 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Of this whale little is precisely known to the Nantucketer, and nothing at all to the professed naturalist.
But this is a harmless little foible in the English whale-hunters, which the Nantucketer does not take much to heart; probably, because he knows that he has a few foibles himself.
Before showing that picture to any Nantucketer, you had best provide for your summary retreat from Nantucket.
Now some Nantucketers rather distrust this historical story of Jonah and the whale.
In this Afric Temple of the Whale I leave you, reader, and if you be a Nantucketer, and a whaleman, you will silently worship there.
And as the mighty iron Leviathan of the modern railway is so familiarly known in its every pace, that, with watches in their hands, men time his rate as doctors that of a baby's pulse; and lightly say of it, the up train or the down train will reach such or such a spot, at such or such an hour; even so, almost, there are occasions when these Nantucketers time that other Leviathan of the deep, according to the observed humor of his speed; and say to themselves, so many hours hence this whale will have gone two hundred miles, will have about reached this or that degree of latitude or longitude.
You can find these Nantucketers on our website and featured in our advertising -- adding to the authenticity we seek to deliver in everything we do" said Bill Kupper.
By late November, 1820, they reached a likely spot, further out in the Pacific than Nantucketers had ever gone.
Twenty-four such permits were secured the following year (Rotch, 1916:27), and permits for 35 whaling vessels were granted by the Continental Congress to Nantucketers shortly before the treaty of peace was signed in 1783 (Rotch, 1916:34).
James Newbegin brought his three daughters to the shearing each year to glean as Ruth did in the Bible story,--only the Nantucketers called it "Tag-locking"--gathering the little locks of wool on the ground, or caught on the bushes and fences, or thrown away as not worth saving, except to those who had time and patience to clean and comb them into yarn.