Narbonensis

Narbonensis

 

(full name Gallia Narbonensis), a Roman province in Transalpine Gaul. It was conquered by the Romans about 120 B.C. In 22 B.C., during the reign of Augustus, Gallia Narbonensis was given provincial status and was one of the provinces that was under the jurisdiction of the Senate. In the fourth century A.D., it was divided into two provinces: Narbonensis Prima, with Narbo Martius (present-day Narbonne) as capital, and Narbonensis Secunda, with Aquae Sextiae (present-day Aix) as capital.

References in periodicals archive ?
In Correlation and Path Coefficient Analysis of seed yield components in the Narbon Bean (Vicia narbonensis L.
Among recently received books from this stable figures Voyage avec Strabon, a new translation of Book IV of Strabo's Geography, which deals with Gaul: it starts with Gallia Narbonensis, Provence and the interior, then Aquitaine, Gallia Lugdunensis and Gallia Belgica; Chapter 5 is devoted to characteristics common to Celtic peoples, and the last two chapters consider Britain and the Alps.
He later served successively as tribune of three cohorts in Rome and then as senior centurion for the second time (primus pilus bis), an enigmatic post, before ending his service as procurator of the province of Narbonensis in southern France.
At that time a Roman aristocrat from Narbonensis (now Narbonne in the South of France) by the name of Aulus Cornelius Celsus wrote De Medicina, which was an encyclopedic overview of medical knowledge based on Greek sources.
167 (ad Rusticum Narbonensis episcopum) inquiry 4 (PL 54:1204B- 1205A); Augustine writes: "Marriage has not been perfected without sexual intercourse," In libro de soliloquis 2.
In Roman times what was the collective term for the regions of Aquitania, Narbonensis, Belgica and Lugdunensis?
Even though it was dwarfed by the Easter processional chant at Sora, the ceremonious antiphon before the great church doors (ante valvas aecclesiae) during the narbonensis dedication procession that culminated in the Procession of Relics (a separate ritual) doubtless created an essentially dramatic scenario.
This independent Greek city-state, lying in the middle of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, had had a politically privileged status in the area ever since the war against the Gallic tribes in 123-21 B.
Indeed it was the threat of Saluvian aggression to the nearby Greek colony of Massalia (modern Marseille) that led to Roman military intervention in Gaul and ultimately to the creation, in the late second century BC, of Rome's first major territory outside Italy; the province of Gallia Narbonensis (Ebel 1976).
Gallia Narbonensis, many of whom were still loyal to Antony, despite
As a key point in the road system and an important river-port, Arles had good communication and contact with other parts of the province of Gallia Narbonensis, other parts of France and the Rhine area and the western and eastern Mediterranean provinces, and this is reflected in the range of glass found in the city.