Narragansett

(redirected from Narraganset)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Narraganset: Narragansett Bay

Narragansett

(năr'əgăn`sət), Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Part of the Eastern Woodlands culture (see under Natives, North AmericanNatives, North American,
peoples who occupied North America before the arrival of the Europeans in the 15th cent. They have long been known as Indians because of the belief prevalent at the time of Columbus that the Americas were the outer reaches of the Indies (i.e.
..... Click the link for more information.
), in the early 17th cent. they occupied most of Rhode Island, from Narragansett Bay on the east to the Pawcatuck River on the west. They were the largest and strongest tribe in New England. The Narragansett escaped the great pestilence of 1617 that swept through S New England, and the remnants of tribes who had suffered joined them for protection, making the Narragansett a powerful people. In 1636, CanonicusCanonicus
, c.1565–1647, Native North American chief, who ruled the Narragansett when the Pilgrims landed in New England. He granted (1636) Rhode Island to Roger Williams and because of William's influence remained friendly to the settlers, despite their aggressive ways.
..... Click the link for more information.
, the Narragansett chief, sold Roger WilliamsWilliams, Roger,
c.1603–1683, clergyman, advocate of religious freedom, founder of Rhode Island, b. London. A protégé of Sir Edward Coke, he graduated from Pembroke College, Cambridge, in 1627 and took Anglican orders.
..... Click the link for more information.
 land on which to settle. Williams gained great influence over the Narragansett, inducing them to become the allies of the Massachusetts colonists in the Pequot War (1637). The Narragansett in 1674 numbered some 5,000. The next year witnessed the outbreak of King Philip's War, which destroyed Native American power in S New England. The Narragansett shared the common fate. Their fort near the site of Kingston, R.I., was attacked (1675) by a colonial force under Josiah Winslow, and in that engagement, known as the Great Swamp Fight, the Narragansett under Canonchet lost almost a thousand men. The survivors migrated to the north and to the west, and a few joined the MahicanMahican
, confederacy of Native North Americans of the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). The Mahican were of the Eastern Woodlands culture area. In the early 17th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and the AbnakiAbnaki
or Abenaki
, Native North Americans of the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). The name Abnaki was given to them by the French; properly it should be Wabanaki,
..... Click the link for more information.
; but a number of them returned and settled among the Niantic near Charlestown, R.I., the combined group taking the Narragansett name. Their numbers steadily declined, and by 1832 there were 80 left. However, by 1990 there were about 2,500 Narragansett in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first concerns the overwhelming impact that English colonial expansion and subsequent economic development had on the ecology of the New England Indians: Massachuset, Mohegan, Quirip, Tunxis, and Narraganset, among others.
Studies in Galveston, Texas, Lake Erie, Narraganset Bay in Rhode Island, and Puget Sound in Washington found TBT concentrations in excess of one part per billion.
Description: Sabbatical on Narraganset Bay, in a community setting, surrounded by natural beauty and woodland trails.
The new research initiative, which is called the Consortium for Coastal Ecology Assessment, Innovation, and Modeling (C-AIM), will develop new scientific techniques and technologies for monitoring the health of Narraganset Bay - the largest estuary in New England and the source of valuable fishing and tourism jobs for Rhode Islanders.
Horman and her husband Paul of Narraganset, RI, and Jean C.
The original 172 titles in the collection are augmented by others including Micmac, the Eliot bible in Massachuset, the Franciscan dictionary of Navajo, Cree, Roger William's Key to Narraganset, and Seneca.
She was a volunteer officer for the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary for 25 years, involved in safety patrols on Narraganset Bay, and performed administrative duties.
A historian's book from 2002 consigns Mohegans, Pequots, and Narragansets to the "many extinct eastern tribes," when in reality they retain the status of federally recognized nations.
First Settlers contains a series of mother-daughter dialogues in which the mother argues that Puritanical Calvinism led to Native American genocide (specifically of the Pequots, Narragansets, and Pokanokets) and that the contemporary victimization of the Cherokees is a legacy of colonialism.