National Defense Education Act


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National Defense Education Act

(NDEA), federal legislation passed in 1958 providing aid to education in the United States at all levels, public and private. NDEA was instituted primarily to stimulate the advancement of education in science, mathematics, and modern foreign languages; but it has also provided aid in other areas, including technical education, area studies, geography, English as a second language, counseling and guidance, school libraries and librarianship, and educational media centers. The act provides institutions of higher education with 90% of capital funds for low-interest loans to students. NDEA also gives federal support for improvement and change in elementary and secondary education. The act contains statutory prohibitions of federal direction, supervision, or control over the curriculum, program of instruction, administration, or personnel of any educational institution.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors propose the establishment of a counterpart to the National Defense Education Act prompted by Sputnik.
The National Defense Education Act of 1958 (NDEA) can be interpreted as a continuation of this underlying policy goal, exported from domestic policy to the Cold War policy arena and redefined for that purpose.
Hence, YAF supported the peacetime draft and its early national director, Douglas Caddy, defended before Congress the loyalty-oath provisions of the National Defense Education Act, arguing state intervention was justified in the name of national security.
in mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1961; he was the first person to complete his studies with a fellowship provided by the National Defense Education Act of 1958, a federally funded program established in the wake of Sputnik and the threat of Soviet hegemony in the space/arms race.
With the addition of the summer guidance institutes funded by the National Defense Education Act of 1958 (P.
We had to expand education in order to keep up with the Sputnik-launching Russkis, hence the National Defense Education Act.
Another important rime in school counseling's history was in the late 1950s when the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) was passed (Herr, 2001).
A few examples of more recent legislation that have provided resources for, advocated career guidance as a policy imperative, and shaped the professional preparation of counselors would include the George Barden Act of 1946, the National Defense Education Act of 1958, the Career Education Incentive Act of 1976, the Carl D.
The National Defense Education Act of 1958 was the primary impetus for the boom mentioned above.
Titles V-A and V-B of the National Defense Education Act of 1958 required states to submit plans to test secondary school students so that academically talented students could be identified and encouraged to enter the hard sciences and other forms of higher education; funds were provided for extensive training of secondary school counselors.
A major piece of federal legislation in the 1950s that was to have substantial impact on how the purpose of guidance in the schools was framed was the National Defense Education Act of 1958.

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