National Historic Preservation Act of 1966

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National Historic Preservation Act of 1966

Expanded the National Register of Historic Places to make it a nationwide inventory of districts, sites, structures, and objects of state and local as well as national importance, maintained by the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. The act also created a review agency, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, made up of federal officials and private citizens to advise the president and Congress on historic preservation matters for highway or utility construction, if they are likely to have any effect on historic structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Justice Department's opinion on the National Historic Preservation Act contradicts the legal conclusion embodied in a recent regulation issued by the Department of Housing Urban Development (HUD).
Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register is part of a program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect historic and archeological resources.
Preservationists use a common language that had its beginnings in the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.
As Congress considered the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, with similar potential to reach state, local, and private sector interests, Hartzog virtually snatched the program away from competitors in the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Starting with contributed discussions on defining art and differentiating between cultural heritage and cultural property, chapters treat topics and legal cases including artists' rights, the legal obligations of museums, protection of cultural heritage in times of war, and the National Historic Preservation Act (US).
MAS is calling on the Corps to fulfill its responsibilities under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act which requires a full and fair review of the effects of the Ikea project on all historic properties in the area, including the dock itself.
In the past, the federal Environmental Protection Agency issued storm water runoff permits for mining operations with a consideration for the National Historic Preservation Act, which required the agency to consult with local American Indian tribes and give them an opportunity to identify and limit impact to culturally sensitive properties.
Because these existing houses are located in a National Register Historic District, it was necessary for the city to comply with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.
In 1966, the National Historic Preservation Act gave a major boost to the burgeoning historic preservation movement.
Construction projects in the United States that are subject to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act may be eligible for LexArchaeology coverage.
The primary business objective is the completion of Federal Document submissions, required by National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.
Facing a complex, overlapping set of regulations that may have conflicting obligations and restrictions, project proponents need to wade through seemingly arbitrary compliance mandates across federal, state, and local permitting requirements, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, Coastal Zone Management Act, and the National Historic Preservation Act.

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