Natsume Soseki

Natsume Soseki

(nä`tso͞o`mĕ sō`sĕ`kē), 1867–1916, Japanese writer. Soseki ranks along with Mori Ogai as one of two giants of early modern Japanese letters. Although Soseki began his career as a scholar of English literature, he later resigned from his position at Tokyo Imperial Univ. to devote his time to writing. His first published work, Wagahai wa neko de aru [I am a cat], a satirical portrait of human vanity, was followed by increasingly pessimistic, brooding novels such as Kokoro [heart] and his unfinished masterpiece, Meian [light and darkness]. Soseki's works often dwell upon the alienation of modern humanity, the search for morality, and the difficulty of human communication.

Soseki, Natsume:

see Natsume SosekiNatsume Soseki
, 1867–1916, Japanese writer. Soseki ranks along with Mori Ogai as one of two giants of early modern Japanese letters. Although Soseki began his career as a scholar of English literature, he later resigned from his position at Tokyo Imperial Univ.
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Natsume Soseki

 

(pseudonym of Natsume Kinnosuke). Born Jan. 5, 1867, in Tokyo; died there Dec. 9, 1916. Japanese writer.

Natsume Soseki wrote poetry in the haiku genre. His first novel, I Am a Cat (1905–06; Russian translation, 1960), was a satire on the Japanese intelligentsia. In his novella Master Darling (1906; Russian translation, 1960), Natsume Soseki depicted an inexperienced young teacher in conflict with the stifling provincial milieu.

Natsume Soseki developed his own aesthetic theory of beauty, contrasting it with the utilitarian ideals of modern life, for example, in his novella The Three-cornered World (1906). The tragedy of the Japanese intellectual, endowed with a sensitive conscience and crushed by the external superiority of Western European culture and at the same time not yet free of the old feudal shackles, became the main theme of Natsume Soseki’s psychological novels. These include the trilogy Sanshiro (1908), And Then (1909), and The Gate (1910)—all of which appeared in Russian translation in 1973—Heart (1914; Russian translation, 1935), and his unfinished Light and Darkness (1916).

REFERENCES

Istoriia sovremennoi iaponskoi literatury. Moscow, 1961.
Konrad, N. Iaponskaia literatura. Moscow, 1974.
Grivnin, V. Natsume Soseki: Biobibliograficheskii ukazatel’. Moscow, 1959.

N. G. IVANENKO

References in periodicals archive ?
Aminova Nodira, 26, translated "Kokoro," by Meiji-era novelist Natsume Soseki (1867-1916), into Uzbek over a roughly two-year period.
FEATURE: Granddaughter raising funds for Natsume Soseki memorial
The second point is a little disingenuous, I think, a ploy by which Ishiguro detaches himself from Western Japanophiles who would like to relate him to such twentieth-century Japanese novelists as Natsume Soseki, Junichiro Tanizaki, and Yasunari Kawabata: there are distinct Japanese characteristics in Ishiguro's work however much he may disclaim them (see Sim 34-36).
This study encompasses authors including Tsubouchi Shoyo, Kuroiwa Ruiko, Natsume Soseki, and Edogawa Ranpo, among others.
Her maternal grandfather was the early 20th century Japanese novelist Natsume Soseki.
Natsume Soseki wrote that attempts to pursue progress must be accompanied by frustration because standards of progress came from the West, not from within.
Buttressing his brief on passages culled from the likes of Montaigne, Balzac, Musil, Proust, Wilde, Valery, David Lodge, and Natsume Soseki, Bayard sets up a list of provocative typologies: "collective libraries" assemble our "screen books," or the objects we create from the books we have read (or have not); "inner libraries" house our "inner books," where our experience plays upon our readings; "virtual libraries" include our "phantom books," those ineffable things we create when we attempt to speak about our readings.
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The Japanese novelist Natsume Soseki is set to join the likes of British wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill and musician John Lennon, with the installation of a permanent reminder of the man at his former London home.
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It stood at the apex of the new Meiji educational system and prepared students for the higher civil service (some became prime ministers), promoted scholarship within the walls of the university, disseminated it outside by placing its graduates in all the major universities of Japan, and nurtured a literary tradition that produced many of the country's greatest novelists, including Natsume Soseki (1867-1916), whose visage graces the widely circulated [yen] 1000 bill.