boundary

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boundary

Cricket
a. the marked limit of the playing area
b. a stroke that hits the ball beyond this limit
c. the four runs scored with such a stroke, or the six runs if the ball crosses the boundary without touching the ground

Boundary

The outer limits of an area, such as a piece of property; which may be defined by a series of markers, fence, stone wall, or other natural feature.

Boundary

 

(Russian, mezha), a narrow strip of uncultivated land, usually overgrown with weeds (mezhnik), that served as the zone between two pieces of landed property.

Boundaries were established by land surveys; sometimes they were indicated by boundary marks. They came into existence when the individual peasants or peasant families began to hold land and when the primitive clan commune developed into a communal organization of neighbors. As part of a system in which private property in land existed, boundaries served to separate the lands of one holder from those of another (separating peasant landed possessions from each other and from those of the pomeshchiki [landlords], state, and crown), as well as to demarcate peasant plots within the lands of the commune. Boundaries were altered when lands were purchased, sold, or, in the case of communes, repartitioned. Special legislation existed to deal with boundaries. During the class struggle of peasants against pomeshchiki, there were instances of the former seizing the lands of the latter; the seizures were usually accompanied by the ploughing up and destruction of the boundaries. Often there were arguments and sharp clashes among the village population over the accuracy of the boundaries and over their preservation.

In the USSR, where the system of socialist land tenure exists, the imperfect system of boundaries has been replaced by a more accurate system of land boundaries determined on the basis of modern land allocation.

boundary

[′bau̇n·drē]
(electronics)
An interface between p- and n-type semiconductor materials, at which donor and acceptor concentrations are equal.
(geology)
A line between areas occupied by rocks or formations of different type and age.
(mathematics)
(science and technology)
A line or area which determines inclusion in a system.

land boundary

A line of demarcation between adjoining parcels of land. The parcels of land may be of the same or different ownership, but were distinguished at one time in the history of their descent by separate legal descriptions.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the botanist Johan Petter Norrlin, Malmberg's close friend, reviewed the book, he noted: "There is often information about animals from Russian Karelia and Russian Lapland; the author has not defined the boundaries of our country along the political borderline but, as is common to our naturalists, removed it somewhat eastwards to Lake Onega and White Sea, where the more noticeable natural boundaries are to be found.
Our model is far more comprehensive, accounting for everything from natural boundaries - waterways or a line of steep hills, for example - to highway access and speed limits, vehicle and pedestrian traffic counts, competitive volume, etc.
That's really the triumph of human liberty stretching across natural boundaries.
com/), a full-service medical spa in Dallas-Fort Worth, is dedicated to offering the latest in non-surgical science and technology that will allow you to push past your body's own natural boundaries, and give you body contouring results you never thought possible.
I think it has to be a large enough area with natural boundaries and it has got to be over a fairly long period.
The project will look at how hedgerows provide homes for animals and plants, while creating natural boundaries.
Its natural boundaries, however, necessarily limit the expansion, putting even more pressure on available land and property stocks.
However, there are already precedents as far as counties playing outside their natural boundaries are concerned.
On the ocean, people of different cultures have broken through natural boundaries to interact with other cultures and to create more advanced societies.
These natural boundaries form a shelter to grow any cultivar under optimal growing conditions.
If we can do this in large enough areas, can reduce the movement of badgers by using natural boundaries and can do this over sustained periods of time, we would expect the incidence of TB in cattle would be reduced.
The North Riding was laid out in the 9th century by Viking settlers, using sensible natural boundaries based on rivers, valleys and ranges of hills.