predation

(redirected from Natural enemies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

predation

[prə′dā·shən]
(biology)
The killing and eating of an individual of one species by an individual of another species.
References in periodicals archive ?
ARS researchers, along with cooperators in China, France, Israel, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan, began plant studies and identified potential natural enemies.
Egg mortality caused by natural enemies was nil during fall 2006, but increased to 38% and 33% during fall 2007 and spring 2008, respectively (Table 1).
The more unique natural enemies that scientists can find and evaluate, the more likely they can deploy new biological control cadres suited to the weed's various growth stages and to different climates and other conditions.
We used this opportunity to: 1) identify and inventory the natural enemies present, and 2) determine their effectiveness for managing the fig whitefly over the Sep to Nov time period.
This defense mechanism can be switched on using chemicals that do not harm the environment and are not toxic to the insects or their natural enemies.
However, the fauna of natural enemies of FAW larvae in Chihuahua State has not been reported.
Thus, importing its coevolved natural enemies isn't expected to endanger native U.
And they will be announcing their latest findings at the Carmarthenshire garden, based on using a cocktail of the pest's natural enemies including microscopic nematode worms and fungi, in the fight against the number one pest of British and European forestry - the pine weevil or Hylobius.
Other natural enemies include the parasitic wasps Aphytis lingnanensis and Comperiella bifasciata, which help control red scale in the Coastal-Intermediate and San Joaquin Valley regions, respectively.
In recent years, integrated pest management systems attempt to use natural enemies in combination with lower doses of insecticides for pest control [16].
This is undesirable due to elevated production costs, exposure of producers and consumers to harmful active ingredients, adverse effects on the environment, reduction of natural enemies, and selection of resistant individuals in the pest populations (THOMAZINI et al.
As it is, we have a coalition made up of two parties who have always been natural enemies and from what you hear the grass roots of both parties aren't very happy.