Naucratis

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Naucratis

(nŏk`rətĭs), ancient city of Egypt, on the Canopic branch of the Nile, 45 mi (72 km) SE of Alexandria. It was probably given (7th cent. B.C.) by Psamtik to Greek colonists from Miletus and was the first Greek settlement in Egypt. The rise of Alexandria and the shifting of the Nile caused its decline. The site has been excavated, revealing pottery of a Greek type and ruins of Greek temples.

Naucratis

 

an ancient Greek colony in Egypt, in the western part of the Nile Delta. Naucratis was founded during the reign of Pharaoh Psamtik I in the mid-seventh century B.C., chiefly by Milesians. In the Hellenistic age, Naucratis, with Alexandria and Ptolemais, enjoyed the rights of a polis with municipal self-government and an elected council and officials. Archaeological excavations, first conducted in 1884, unearthed sanctuaries, the remains of workshops (pottery, glassmaking, and faience), and numerous inscriptions.

Naucratis

an ancient Greek city in N Egypt, in the Nile delta: founded in the 7th century bc
References in periodicals archive ?
The historical connection could be strengthened if it could be shown that alphabetic numerals were used at Naukratis at an early date, or in Egypt at any time in the Late period.
The alternative to the hypothesis of Egyptian borrowing is that a nearly identical numerical notation system was developed independently by the Ionians within a few decades after they came into contact with Egyptians in large numbers and founded a colony at Naukratis, where traders were no doubt exposed to the demotic numerals widely used for administration and commerce throughout Lower Egypt.
The Naukratis evidence probably includes no cemetery material.
is mainly a cup-painter; but this will not explain why the KX painter, whose lekanides are found even more commonly than his cups outside Attica, is not better represented at Vari; nor why the KY painter is more popular than KX on Aigina while the reverse is true at Athens and Naukratis.
Sophilos is now more common, rather than less, in Naukratis [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 4 OMITTED] than at Vari or Aigina, and only in the case of Athens is the number of pots identified the same.
Athens 7 14 21 Vari 0 1 1 Aigina 3 1 4 Naukratis 4 3 7
Finds at Naukratis of works of early 6th-century Athenian pot painters.
Among other features of note, outside Athens the only sites receiving a significant proportion of their pottery in the form of lekanides are Naukratis and Tocra, and the only sites receiving a significant proportion of their pottery in the form of skyphoi are Perachora and Aigina; Kavala and Thasos in the north [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 8 OMITTED] Aegean both predominantly receive kylikes with lekanides the next most popular shape; Tell Sukas in the Levant has a preference for krateres and hydriai, unparalleled elsewhere.
The work of some painters (painters known after pots found on the Athenian Acropolis) is found only at Athens, of others only at Athens and in Etruria (Nearkhos) or at Athens, Naukratis and Etruria (Kleitias).