Navassa Island


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Navassa Island

(nəvă`sə), Fr. Navasse, coral and limestone islet, c.1 sq mi (2.6 sq km), in the Caribbean Sea between Haiti and Jamaica. Located c.100 mi (160 km) S of the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the uninhabited island is an unincorporated American territory. Claimed by the United States in 1857, Navassa was the site of a guano-mining operation (1865–98) and a coast guard lighthouse (1917–96). An area of great biodiversity, the island is now a wildlife refuge.
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This small size structure of the reef fish assemblage at Navassa Island is also born out in extensive reef fish visual censuses conducted during the expedition (McClellan and Miller, 2003).
While the hawksbill turtles observed were not large, it is likely that Navassa Island serves as a juvenile habitat similar to other offshore islands in the Caribbean such as Buck Island (St.
Shallow coastal habitats are absent at Navassa Island and the only conch habitat we observed is on an interspersed sand/patch reef terrace surrounding the island at 25-30 m depth.
It is also highly likely that substantial shifts in species composition have already occurred in the Navassa Island fishery.
Summary of taxa and approximate number in the catch that was exposed and visible in Haitian fishing boats observed at Navassa Island during 29 Oct-9 Nov 2002.
Since 1900 there have been few scientific expeditions to Navassa Island (conducted principally to assess terrestrial fauna: Ekman, 1929; Clench, 1930; Burns et al.
The concept of Navassa Island as a pristine and entirely unexploited marine habitat must be viewed with caution.
The value of Navassa Island as a unique marine habitat can be established through continued studies of its marine ecosystem.
During April 1999, Navassa Island was declared a National Wildlife Refuge.