Nazism

(redirected from Nazi policies)
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Related to Nazi policies: Nuremberg Laws

Nazism:

see National SocialismNational Socialism
or Nazism,
doctrines and policies of the National Socialist German Workers' party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933 to 1945.
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Nazism

see NATIONAL SOCIALISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a 1968 Library of Congress study focused on Nazi policies in the occupied countries, it was "unable to locate references to any German use of registration lists to collect firearms.
Bringing Nazi policies of the 1930s to present day North Wales would make Plaid a Party of pure bred Welsh speakers with contempt for everyone else and committed to destroying the trade union movement.
This exhibit and publication, originating at Concordia's FOFA Gallery, is co-sponsored by Christie's and Sotheby's and will travel to venues in North America, Europe and Israel to sensitize the public to the Stern Project and to resolving the injustices caused by Nazi policies.
Here Herzog addresses questions of continuity or rupture in sexual behaviours, attitudes, and policies between the Weimar and Nazi eras, and then focuses on Nazi policies and controls.
She shows the relationship between Nazi policies and tactics used in the USSR in the 1930s and in the Spanish Civil War.
Many asked why the monument should be to Jewish dead only, rather than all the others murdered under Nazi policies, for instance homosexuals, the handicapped, and whole races like the Sinti and Roma (gypsies).
The suggestion, rather, is that by their [alleged] failure to denounce those policies and to excommunicate those Nazi leaders who had Catholic backgrounds, church officials signaled that Catholics could legitimately support Nazi policies without peril to their souls or to their standing in the church.
The leader of the Freedom Party at the time was Jorg Haider, who praised the Nazi policies of Adolf Hitler and made many anti-Semitic remarks.
He then examines the means through which the Vichy government adopted Nazi policies regarding Jews and put them into effect.
In recent years there has been a growing interest in the musical life of Nazi Germany, with scholars such as Michael Kater and Pamela Potter contributing much to our understanding of how Nazi policies and attitudes affected the German musical world during the dark years of the Third Reich.
Commonly, police and other Germans either actively or passively participated and supported Nazi policies.
He convincingly reveals the church's direct and indirect involvement in Nazi policies and programs.