Nazi

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Related to Nazification: Nuremberg Laws

Nazi:

see National SocialismNational Socialism
or Nazism,
doctrines and policies of the National Socialist German Workers' party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933 to 1945.
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Nazi

Nazionalsozialist; rabid anti-Semite member of Hitler’s party. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer]
See: Bigotry

Nazi

Jew-baiting, murderous Aryan supremacist under Hitler. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer]

Nazi

a member of the fascist National Socialist German Workers' Party, which was founded in 1919 and seized political control in Germany in 1933 under the Austrian-born German dictator Adolf Hitler (1889--1945)
References in periodicals archive ?
Schlegelberger had been content with the Nazification of the legal sector, or at least not objected to it until he was elevated to be Acting Minister.
Remy, The Heidelberg Myth: The Nazification and Denazification of a German University (Cambridge, 2002), 1, 3; Max Weinreich, Hitler's Professors: The Part of Scholarship in Germany's Crimes Against the Jewish People (New Haven, 1999 [1946]), 9.
political and media bombardment" that has lead to the "Hitlerization of Hussein and the Nazification of Iraq.
Tal has noted, in fact, that many Christians who contended against the nazification of the German churches did so by linking Jewish and Nazi attitudes toward Christianity.
Nazification of Sovereignists, Populist Mobilization and Legitimation by Politicians
Barth and Bultmann, early allies in the dialectical theology movement, remained consistently opposed to the Nazification of theology and church.
Anything other than outright nazification is, by definition, "different .
Among specific topics are Canadian attempts to curb hate mail in the Zundel case, the Nazification of the German legal system, elite Catholic isolationism in the US during Nazi genocide, literary representations of the 1915 genocide of Armenians, and the consideration of the Holocaust in American life.
The second that pitted the German Christians against the Confessing Church, in which the latter claimed to defend the Protestant Church's autonomy and theological integrity against the German Christians' nazification, brought state intervention through the Reich Ministry for Church Affairs; an intervention so debilitating that church leaders charged with mediating internal church disputes could not protect Protestant child welfare against the NSV.