Nazarite

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Nazarite

(năz`ərīt') [Heb. nazir=consecrated], in the Bible, a man dedicated to God. The Nazarite, after taking a special vow, abstained from intoxicating beverages, never cut his hair, and avoided corpses. An inadvertent breach of these rules called for purificatory rites. His vow was for a fixed term (though it could also be for life), at the end of which he was released. Samuel, the prophet, and Samson were Nazarites. The name is also spelled Nazirite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those that say he was a Nazirite derive it from the use of the word morah (razor), as in the case of Samson: For you are going to conceive and bear a son; let no razor [morah] touch his head, for the boy is to be a Nazirite to God from the womb on (Judg.
I therefore suggest that the prooftext that it was indeed Elkanah who consecrated Samuel as a Nazirite is found in I Samuel 1:23: Her husband Elkanah said to her: 'Do as you think best.
Why is the section on the Nazirites placed just after the section on the Sotah in Numbers (Chapter 6) ?
The story of Samson, the nazirite, suggests that hair was regarded as having a special force or vitality.
Even informed readers of the Hebrew Bible may be surprised to learn that Samson is the only biblical personality burdened prenatally with the nazirite code of conduct and a sacred task.
In the essay that follows, the central opportunity for interpretation is created by the juxtaposition of two apparently unrelated injunctions in the book of Numbers (whose Hebrew title is Bamidbar): the Sotah, the ordeal of a wife susp ected by her husband of adultery, and the vows of the Nazir, the Nazirite or ascetic.
It is according to the view of Rabbi; [2] for it has been taught: Rabbi says, Why does the section of the Nazirite adjoin that of the suspected woman?
The Nazirites were a strict Jewish group that had certain dietary prohibitions, among them not drinking wine.
The first gloss on [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] offers a synoptic, and somewhat cryptic, explanation for the reference to purple: "The braided hair of your Nazirites are as beautiful with mitzvot as braided purple" [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Nazirites in late Second Temple Judaism; a survey of ancient Jewish writings, the New Testament, archaeological evidence, and other writings from late antiquity.
12) Amos includes several incidents in the single event--clearing the land of Amorites, journey in the wilderness, and instituting prophets and Nazirites (2:9-11).
This section also included a description of the activities of those persons who were not associated with the Temple or its cult yet who had important roles in Israelite religious life: the prophets," the nazirites, and, most significantly to Sigonio, the scribes, whom he described as "teachers" or "interpreters of the law.