Neapolitan


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Related to Neapolitan: Neapolitan chord

Neapolitan

1. a native or inhabitant of Naples
2. of or relating to Naples
References in classic literature ?
These Neapolitans always ask four times as much money as they intend to take, but if you give them what they first demand, they feel ashamed of themselves for aiming so low, and immediately ask more.
I only wish you were not, for there's nothing I should enjoy more than taking on another Neapolitan or two.
I knew it merely from my knowledge of the Neapolitans, for I had no idea who the man might be.
And I had stolen nothing, mark you, but only borrowed a revolver from a drawer in the Count's desk, with one or two trifling accessories; for by this time I had the measure of these damned Neapolitans.
none of those interesting adventures fell in his way; the lovely Genoese, Florentines, and Neapolitans were all faithful, if not to their husbands, at least to their lovers, and thought not of changing even for the splendid appearance of Albert de Morcerf; and all he gained was the painful conviction that the ladies of Italy have this advantage over those of France, that they are faithful even in their infidelity.
Of four hundred thousand who crossed the Vistula," he wrote further of the Russian war, "half were Austrians, Prussians, Saxons, Poles, Bavarians, Wurttembergers, Mecklenburgers, Spaniards, Italians, and Neapolitans.
The Neapolitan macchietta had its origins in seventeenth-century, comic dialect literature, and was fully developed in the variety theatre of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
John Turturro, whose doc, "Passione," explores the stories behind Neapolitan music and is getting nice Italo notice, is angry about the tons of trash piling up in
The basic Neapolitan pizza is the Margherita," Craig said.
Made of vicuna, one of the world's rarest natural fibres, the suit is meticulously hand-sewn by a team of artisans who have undergone rigorous in-house training in the Neapolitan tailoring tradition.
Nancy Canepa's thirty-page introduction is a fundamental part of the volume, and is divided into several sections: Basile's Life (a biography of this author in the context of the city, culture, and language of Naples); Publishing History (including the books' early popularity outside of the Neapolitan context); Basile and Neapolitan; The Novella Heritage; Basile and the History of the Literary Fairy Tale (from the ancient world to Calvino's collection); The Structure of the Collection (particularly the framing technique and principal motifs); Reading The Tale of Tales (Canepa's general interpretation of the book); This Translation.
I would like to mention here a brief document that seems to have slipped by Fabris's scrutiny and might help to partly disperse the dense fog surrounding the early Neapolitan years of Provenzale.