Neo-Baroque


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Neo-Baroque

Said of a mode of architecture (in the late 19th century and early 20th century) more or less patterned after Baroque architecture developed in the 17th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you're anywhere near North John Street, you can't miss it - it's bright blue neo-Baroque, with cream and gold trim, and a square slate spaceship perched on top.
The Grade II listed building dating back to 1880 is a neo-Baroque, 3-storey ZweiflE-gelbau with Mansardwalmdach.
Trust us, Szechenyi is like no other public baths you have ever been to: a glorious confection of yellow and white neo-Baroque extravagance.
There followed at least a decade of deterioration and indecision before it re-emerged with enough of its Edwardian neo-baroque retained to promote familiarity.
It was part of Germany from 1870 to 1918 (and again of course from 1940-1944); during the first of these periods, the newly unified and increasingly prosperous German Empire was anxious to make its mark on its possession and on the whole did so with a good deal of elegance and sympathy for the existing fabric (though the 1888 Emperor's palace is as heavy a piece of imperial neo-Baroque as can be found anywhere).
Agriculture and commerce are represented by the other groups of figures on the neo-Baroque structure which has survived two world wars - it was one of the only things in that area left standing after the city was flattened by bombs during the blitz.
Its title, 'Largo Siciliano', implies baroque models, and, in fact, there is often neo-baroque tweaking of the melodic lines which otherwise breathe the late-Romanticism of early Schoenberg.
In 1908 the Palace Wing, inspired by the neo-baroque movement and integrating key elements of Art Nouveau, was added to the hotel by architects Jost, Bezencenet and Schnell.
And there is also an awesome anthology of religious icons that, with neo-Baroque perspectival tricks, revive the Catholic mysticism of Counter-Reformation art.
Even London's two most significant performance buildings, Lasdun's National Theatre and Barry's Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, have often been quietly decried as undistinguished when compared with the holistic dynamism of Scharoun's Philharmonie and the Neo-Baroque splendour of Garnier's Paris Opera.