neoplasia

(redirected from Neoplastic processes)
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neoplasia

[‚nē·ə′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Formation of a neoplasm or tumor.
Formation of new tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, there is an interesting protein called S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 that is overexpressed in the course of neoplastic processes.
Also, level of alfa feto protein, serum BHCG, abdominal sonography, portal and hepatic vein Doppler sonography, and abdominal spiral CT scan with intravenous and oral contrast were conducted and revealed no clue for vascular problems-including portal vein thrombosis and hematoma-as well as neoplastic processes such as hemangioma, hepatocellular adenoma and carcinoma, infantile hemangioendothelioma, cholangiocarcinoma, hepatoblastoma, and metastatic tumors of the liver.
This presentation can either be as a result of physiological, iatrogenic (by means of stimulation with medications) or neoplastic processes.
The p53 centrality in neoplastic processes stimulates the search for an anticancer therapy model from this gene (FETT-CONT & SALLES, 2002; ZENG et al.
To date, no relationships between tissue expression of MMP-3 and the advancement of neoplastic processes and survival prognosis have been found [8,17].
Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal hemorrhages, as well as many other congenital, inflammatory, infectious, or neoplastic processes occurring either locally or at distance from the groin may present in the groin, simulating a hernia or within an inguinal hernia itself (ref 19).
Overall risk factors for lung hernias include environmental and operative trauma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory and neoplastic processes, and chronic steroid use.
The differential diagnosis of these swellings is vast and ranges from acute obstructive salivary gland disease to neoplastic processes.
The clinical laboratory findings described in this study were not suggestive of neoplastic processes, but only reflected the consequences of the neoplastic growth in one dog that had severe loss of blood; these results suggest that routine clinical laboratory evaluations might not be of any diagnostic significance in canine chemodectoma.
This will allow confident differentiation from other conditions that may mimic PVNS, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other inflammatory and neoplastic processes of the synovial lining.