NetWare client


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NetWare client

A desktop machine in a NetWare network, which used proprietary communications protocols to access a NetWare server (see IPX and NCP). Known as a "NetWare shell," Microsoft and Novell provided client software for Windows. Unix and Mac NetWare shells were also available. As of NetWare 5 in 1998, NetWare natively supported TCP/IP, the Internet protocol that was becoming the global standard. See NetWare and NetWare 6.
References in periodicals archive ?
NetWare Client for Mac is now compatible with Mac OS X 10.
Ease of Use Features - Quick and EZ Guide provides concise, easy-to-read instructions for network card installation and configuration - EZdosodi software provides one-step Novell NetWare client installation in less than 30 seconds - EZStart(TM) utility simplifies driver installation and provides network card diagnostics - Diagnostic LED indicators provide status of link integrity, network activity, and operating mode - Auto-Negotiation automatically configures the network card for the optimal operating mode available - Windows-friendly SuperDisk for easy configuration in Windows 95 and NT environments
The new GoCard is also easy to install and configure, with a new utility completely automating the installation of NetWare client software.
Mississippi includes an unlimited license for DOS, Windows and NetWare client software.
Other features include support for Windows, Unix/Linux, Macintosh and NetWare clients as well as for network management tools, backup agents and anti-virus software.
When users need to access the CD server from NetWare clients, they should be able to use the same access procedures as for any NetWare fileserver.
It also supports NAS and NetWare clients as well as Veritas Volume Manager on Solaris and Windows platforms.
The Fire Series allows NFS, Windows, Macintosh and NetWare clients to use the library transparently and integrates with the complete product line from Canto.
The Fire Series allows NFS, Windows, Macintosh, and NetWare clients to use the library as if it were a native NFS, LAN Manager, AppleShare, or NetWare server.
While Solaris makes a great file and print server for any Windows, OS/2, NCs or Mac client, it can go far beyond that with application services, Web services -- even to NetWare clients without TCP/IP -- and "any client" access to legacy data anywhere in the enterprise.