Inhibitor

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Related to Neuraminidase inhibitor: Oseltamivir, amantadine, Tamiflu, Zanamivir

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Until 2007, resistance against neuraminidase inhibitors was rarely observed (1,3,4).
When taken within 48 hours after onset of symptoms and continued for 5 days, neuraminidase inhibitors (zanamivir and oseltamivir) (19) reduce the duration and seriousness of influenza by 1 to 2 days for adults (20-24), children (22,25,26), and persons at high risk (22,27-29).
Very low pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 mortality associated with early neuraminidase inhibitor treatment in Japan: analysis of 1000 hospitalized children.
Oseltamivir, the neuraminidase inhibitor, and amantadine, an M2 ion channel inhibitor, face 90% and 100% resistance respectively, in some areas.
Impact of neuraminidase inhibitor treatment on outcomes of public health importance during the 2009-2010 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis in hospitalized patients.
The meta-analysis also included five observational studies and two surveys that compared the second marketed neuraminidase inhibitor, inhaled zanamivir, with no antiviral therapy in patients treated as outpatients.
Laninamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor administered only by inhalation.
Among specific topics are pathogenesis of avian influenza (H5N1) infection in humans, the activity of neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir against all subtypes of influenza viruses, alternative strategies for developing vaccines against pandemic influenza, micronutrients in the global fight against influenza, the impact of an emerging avian influenza virus (H5N1) in a seabird colony, and controlling influenza at healthcare facilities in resource-limited settings.
Oseltamivir phosphate, marketed as Tamiflu, is a popular neuraminidase inhibitor widely used to treat flu symptoms.
Surveillance for neuraminidase inhibitor resistance among human influenza A and B viruses circulating worldwide in 2004-2008.
A global surveillance network called the Neuraminidase Inhibitor Susceptibility Network (NISN) has been set up with the World Health Organisation (WHO) to monitor the possible emergence of viral resistance to these drugs.
Efficacy and safety of the oral neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in treating acute influenza.